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High fractional exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophils are associated with an increased risk of future virus-induced exacerbations -NDASH- a prospective cohort study

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@article{40b1718574164cf39083115773519fe5,
title = "High fractional exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophils are associated with an increased risk of future virus-induced exacerbations -NDASH- a prospective cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The major trigger of asthma exacerbations is infection with a respiratory virus, most commonly rhinovirus. Type 2 inflammation is known to be associated with an increased risk of exacerbations in general. Whether type 2 inflammation at baseline increases the risk of future virus-induced exacerbations is unknown.OBJECTIVE: To assess whether type 2 inflammation is associated with an increased risk of virus-induced exacerbations of asthma.METHODS: Stable asthmatics had spirometry, skin prick test, measurement of FeNO and sputum induced for differential cell counts. Patients were followed-up for 18-months, during which they were assessed at the research unit when they had symptoms of an exacerbation. Nasal swabs collected at these assessments underwent viral detection by PCR.RESULTS: A total of 81 asthma patients were recruited, of which 22 (27{\%}) experienced an exacerbation during the follow-up period. Of these, 15 (68{\%}) had a respiratory virus detected at exacerbation. Sputum eosinophils > 1{\%} at baseline increased the risk of having a subsequent virus-induced exacerbation (HR 7.6 95{\%} CI 1.6-35.2, p=0.010), as did having FeNO > 25 ppb (HR 3.4 95{\%} CI 1.1-10.4, p=0.033). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Asger Bjerregaard and Laing, {Ingrid A} and Vibeke Backer and Asger Sverrild and Siew-Kim Khoo and Glenys Chidlow and Chisha Sikazwe and Smith, {David W} and {Le Sou{\"e}f}, Peter and Celeste Porsbjerg",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/cea.12935",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
journal = "Clinical Allergy",
issn = "0954-7894",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - High fractional exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophils are associated with an increased risk of future virus-induced exacerbations -NDASH- a prospective cohort study

AU - Bjerregaard, Asger

AU - Laing, Ingrid A

AU - Backer, Vibeke

AU - Sverrild, Asger

AU - Khoo, Siew-Kim

AU - Chidlow, Glenys

AU - Sikazwe, Chisha

AU - Smith, David W

AU - Le Souëf, Peter

AU - Porsbjerg, Celeste

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: The major trigger of asthma exacerbations is infection with a respiratory virus, most commonly rhinovirus. Type 2 inflammation is known to be associated with an increased risk of exacerbations in general. Whether type 2 inflammation at baseline increases the risk of future virus-induced exacerbations is unknown.OBJECTIVE: To assess whether type 2 inflammation is associated with an increased risk of virus-induced exacerbations of asthma.METHODS: Stable asthmatics had spirometry, skin prick test, measurement of FeNO and sputum induced for differential cell counts. Patients were followed-up for 18-months, during which they were assessed at the research unit when they had symptoms of an exacerbation. Nasal swabs collected at these assessments underwent viral detection by PCR.RESULTS: A total of 81 asthma patients were recruited, of which 22 (27%) experienced an exacerbation during the follow-up period. Of these, 15 (68%) had a respiratory virus detected at exacerbation. Sputum eosinophils > 1% at baseline increased the risk of having a subsequent virus-induced exacerbation (HR 7.6 95% CI 1.6-35.2, p=0.010), as did having FeNO > 25 ppb (HR 3.4 95% CI 1.1-10.4, p=0.033). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - BACKGROUND: The major trigger of asthma exacerbations is infection with a respiratory virus, most commonly rhinovirus. Type 2 inflammation is known to be associated with an increased risk of exacerbations in general. Whether type 2 inflammation at baseline increases the risk of future virus-induced exacerbations is unknown.OBJECTIVE: To assess whether type 2 inflammation is associated with an increased risk of virus-induced exacerbations of asthma.METHODS: Stable asthmatics had spirometry, skin prick test, measurement of FeNO and sputum induced for differential cell counts. Patients were followed-up for 18-months, during which they were assessed at the research unit when they had symptoms of an exacerbation. Nasal swabs collected at these assessments underwent viral detection by PCR.RESULTS: A total of 81 asthma patients were recruited, of which 22 (27%) experienced an exacerbation during the follow-up period. Of these, 15 (68%) had a respiratory virus detected at exacerbation. Sputum eosinophils > 1% at baseline increased the risk of having a subsequent virus-induced exacerbation (HR 7.6 95% CI 1.6-35.2, p=0.010), as did having FeNO > 25 ppb (HR 3.4 95% CI 1.1-10.4, p=0.033). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1111/cea.12935

DO - 10.1111/cea.12935

M3 - Journal article

VL - 47

JO - Clinical Allergy

JF - Clinical Allergy

SN - 0954-7894

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 50268880