Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation as Treatment for Patients with DOCK8 Deficiency

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Sensitivity of Multiple Breath Washout to Detect Mild to Moderate Asthma in Adolescence

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Development of the International Severe Asthma Registry (ISAR): a modified Delphi study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Injured skin as risk factor for chlorhexidine anaphylaxis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Intraoperative anaphylaxis: remember the hidden allergens

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. FeNO and Exercise Testing in Children at Risk of Asthma

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Long-term health outcomes in survivors of childhood AML treated with allogeneic HSCT: a NOPHO-AML Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Treatment dilemmas in asymptomatic children with primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Screening for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome by flow cytometry

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  4. Reconstitution of Th17, Tc17 and Treg cells after paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Impact of interleukin-7

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Inborn Errors Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and the European Society for Primary Immunodeficiencies
View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Biallelic variations in the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) gene cause a combined immunodeficiency with eczema, recurrent bacterial and viral infections, and malignancy. Natural disease outcome is dismal, but allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can cure the disease.

OBJECTIVE: To determine outcome of HSCT for DOCK8 deficiency and define possible outcome variables.

METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of the results of HSCT in a large international cohort of DOCK8-deficient patients.

RESULTS: We identified 81 patients from 22 centers transplanted at a median age of 9.7 years (range, 0.7-27.2 years) between 1995 and 2015. After median follow-up of 26 months (range, 3-135 months), 68 (84%) patients are alive. Severe acute (III-IV) or chronic graft versus host disease occurred in 11% and 10%, respectively. Causes of death were infections (n = 5), graft versus host disease (5), multiorgan failure (2), and preexistent lymphoma (1). Survival after matched related (n = 40) or unrelated (35) HSCT was 89% and 81%, respectively. Reduced-toxicity conditioning based on either treosulfan or reduced-dose busulfan resulted in superior survival compared with fully myeloablative busulfan-based regimens (97% vs 78%; P = .049). Ninety-six percent of patients younger than 8 years at HSCT survived, compared with 78% of those 8 years and older (P = .06). Of the 73 patients with chimerism data available, 65 (89%) had more than 90% donor T-cell chimerism at last follow-up. Not all disease manifestations responded equally well to HSCT: eczema, infections, and mollusca resolved quicker than food allergies or failure to thrive.

CONCLUSIONS: HSCT is curative in most DOCK8-deficient patients, confirming this approach as the treatment of choice. HSCT using a reduced-toxicity regimen may offer the best chance for survival.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice
Volume7
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)848-855
Number of pages8
ISSN2213-2198
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

ID: 56427276