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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Health-related quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease in a Danish population-based inception cohort

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  1. The association of celiac disease and allergic disease in a general adult population

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  2. Dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases in a high-risk population: Results from the Faroese IBD study

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  3. The distribution of HLA DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes and their association with health indicators in a general Danish population

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  3. Plasma calprotectin is superior to serum calprotectin as a biomarker of intestinal inflammation in ulcerative colitis

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  4. Enhanced processing of von Willebrand factor reflects disease severity and discriminates severe portal hypertension in cirrhosis

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  5. A 10-Year Follow-up Study of the Natural History of Perianal Crohn's Disease in a Danish Population-Based Inception Cohort

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Background: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but findings differ between studies. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of disease activity and social factors on HRQoL.

Method: A total of 513 patients diagnosed with UC and CD between 2003 and 2004, in a population-based setting, were followed for 7 years. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form-12, the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Questionnaire (SIBDQ), the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire: General Health and a national health survey. Associations were assessed using multiple linear regressions.

Results: A total of 185 of the eligible patients (UC: 107 (50.2%) and CD: 78 (50.3%)) were included. No differences in disease-specific or generic HRQoL were found between CD and UC patients, and IBD patients did not differ compared with the background population. The majority of CD (73.1%) and UC (85.0%) patients had 'good' disease-specific HRQoL using the SIBDQ. Unemployment for ≥ 3 months occurred more in CD vs UC patients(30.6 vs 15.5%, p = 0.03); however, sick leave for ≥ 3 months did not differ significantly (17.4 vs 11.4%, p = 0.4). Using multiple linear regressions, unemployment, sick leave and disease activity were the factors most frequently associated with reduced HRQoL.

Conclusion: In a population-based cohort with 7 years of follow-up, HRQoL did not differ between patients and the background population.

Original languageEnglish
JournalUnited European Gastroenterology Journal
Volume7
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)942-954
Number of pages13
ISSN2050-6406
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

ID: 57822521