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Health facility-based data on women receiving sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy in Tanzania: Lessons to learn from a cross-sectional survey in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts and other national survey reports

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  1. Prevalence and predictors of maternal smoking prior to and during pregnancy in a regional Danish population: a cross-sectional study

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  2. Mapping the lack of public initiative against female genital mutilation in Denmark

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  3. Fertility awareness and attitudes towards parenthood among Danish university college students

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  4. Does weight loss improve semen quality and reproductive hormones? Results from a cohort of severely obese men

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  1. Prevention of opportunistic non-communicable diseases

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  2. Children as visionary change agents in Danish school health promotion

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  3. Local adaption of intrapartum clinical guidelines, United Republic of Tanzania

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Background: A study of health facility (HF) data on women receiving sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) was carried out at antenatal care clinics in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods. A review of health management information system (HMIS) registers, interviews with health-care workers (HWs) and district and national level malaria control program managers corroborated by inter-temporal assessment through observations at HF levels. Statistical data were analyzed in Excel and interpreted in triangulation with qualitative data from interviews and observations. Results: Data indicated that IPTp doses administered to women were inadequate and partly inconsistent. HMIS registers lacked space for IPT records, forcing HWs to manipulate their record-keeping. The proportion/number of IPTp recipients in related to the supply of SP for free delivery, to women's attendance behaviours, showed variation by quarter and year of reporting. Conclusion: It is impossible to achieve rational health service planning when the HMIS is weak. Whilst it is acknowledged that the HMIS is already overloaded, concerted measures are urgently needed to accommodate data on new interventions and other vertical programs if malaria programs are to achieve their goals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6
JournalReproductive Health
Volume11
Issue number1
ISSN1742-4755
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jan 2014

    Research areas

  • Antenatal care, Health information, Intermittent, Malaria prevention

ID: 52402530