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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Health educational background as a predictor of non-participation in national colorectal cancer screening: A cross-sectional population study among 886,088 invited Danes

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  1. Participation in cervical cancer screening among immigrants and Danish-born women in Denmark

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  2. The cardiovascular effects of electronic cigarettes: A systematic review of experimental studies

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  3. Low-dose aspirin use and risk of contralateral breast cancer: a Danish nationwide cohort study

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  4. Functional consequences of genetic variation in sodium channel modifiers in early onset lone atrial fibrillation

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  1. Regional variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: incidence and survival - a nationwide study of regions in Denmark

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  2. Genome-wide association and Mendelian randomisation analysis provide insights into the pathogenesis of heart failure

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  3. Socioeconomic position and one-year mortality risk among patients with heart failure: A nationwide register-based cohort study

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  4. Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

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Health information knowledge may affect attitude toward colorectal cancer screening, but the participation of health educated citizens are unknown. Therefore, we investigated non-participation in a sample of 886,088 invited participants, based on educational length, type, and level. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the odds of non-participation in Danish men and women based on educational type and length. Models were adjusted for age, income, marital status and immigration status. Information was derived from National registers. Men with long educational length level had increased odds of non-participation if their education was within the field of medicine/medical science (OR 1.87) or belonged to other long health educations, but not in nursing and health care, compared to other long educations after full model adjustment. Women with long educational length level had increased odds of non-participation if they were educated in the field of medicine/medical science (OR 1.47), whereas they had decreased odds in the fields of nursing and health care and other long health educations, compared to other long educations after full model adjustment. Men within short educational length level did not have different odds of nonparticipation, after full model adjustments, whereas women within short health educations were at increased odds in the youngest age group and at decreased odds in the eldest age group. Having an education in the field of medicine/medical science is associated with non-participation in colorectal cancer screening in Denmark 2014-2015. Opposite, an educational background in nursing and health care increased participation in women, but not in men.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume125
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
ISSN0091-7435
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

ID: 57550692