Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Glucocorticoid treatment for non-cerebral diseases in children and adolescents is associated with differences in uncinate fasciculus microstructure

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Gestational age-dependent development of the neonatal metabolome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Changes in pulmonary oxygen content are detectable with laser absorption spectroscopy: proof of concept in newborn piglets

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Gut transit time, using radiological contrast imaging, to predict early signs of necrotizing enterocolitis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Does height and IGF-I determine pubertal timing in girls?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Børn med iskæmisk apopleksi

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewpeer-review

  2. No detectable effect on visual responses using functional MRI in a rodent model of α-synuclein expression

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Elp2 mutations perturb the epitranscriptome and lead to a complex neurodevelopmental phenotype

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Educational attainment does not influence brain aging

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that fronto-limbic brain regions and connecting white matter fibre tracts in the left hemisphere are more sensitive to glucocorticoids than in the right hemisphere. It is unknown whether treatment with glucocorticoids in childhood is associated with microstructural differences of the uncinate fasciculus and cingulum bundle, which connect fronto-limbic brain regions. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prior glucocorticoid treatment would be associated with differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) of the left relative to right uncinate fasciculus and cingulum bundle.

METHODS: We performed diffusion-weighted imaging in 28 children and adolescents aged 7-16 years previously treated with glucocorticoids for nephrotic syndrome or rheumatic disease and 28 healthy controls.

RESULTS: Patients displayed significantly different asymmetry in the microstructure of uncinate fasciculus with higher left but similar right uncinate fasciculus FA and axial diffusivity compared to controls. No apparent differences were observed for the cingulum. Notably, higher cumulative glucocorticoid doses were significantly associated with higher uncinate fasciculus FA and axial diffusivity bilaterally.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that previous glucocorticoid treatment for non-cerebral diseases in children and adolescents is associated with long-term changes in the microstructure of the uncinate fasciculi, and that higher cumulative glucocorticoid doses have a proportional impact on the microstructure.

IMPACT: It is unknown if treatment with glucocorticoids in childhood have long-term effects on fronto-limbic white matter microstructure. The study examined if children and adolescents previously treated with glucocorticoids for nephrotic syndrome or rheumatic disorder differed in fronto-limbic white matter microstructure compared to healthy controls. The nephrotic and rheumatic patients had higher left but similar right uncinate fasciculus FA and axial diffusivity. Higher bilateral uncinate fasciculus FA and axial diffusivity was associated with higher cumulative glucocorticoid doses. We revealed new evidence suggesting that previous glucocorticoid treatment for non-cerebral diseases in children and adolescents is associated with long-term changes in uncinate fasciculi microstructure.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatric Research
ISSN0031-3998
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to the International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

ID: 64651811