Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Global prevalence and bidirectional association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease - A systematic review and meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{1a090a6fb3b040bb91576ae4784714e5,
title = "Global prevalence and bidirectional association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease - A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background and Aims: Epidemiological studies have established an association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], i.e. ulcerative colitis [UC] and Crohn's disease [CD], but results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the prevalences and association between IBD and psoriasis. Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE were searched from database inception through April 2018 for studies reporting data on psoriasis among patients with IBD and vice versa. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate, respectively, the prevalences and association between IBD and psoriasis. Data extraction was according to the PRISMA guideline, and quality assessment was made using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The main outcomes were the proportion of psoriasis patients with IBD and vice versa, as well as the association (odds ratio [OR]) of IBD in psoriasis and psoriasis in IBD, respectively. Results: Based on quantitative analysis of 93 studies, the prevalence of psoriasis in CD and in UC was 3.6{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 3.1{\%}-4.6{\%}) and 2.8{\%} [95{\%} CI 2.0{\%}-3.8{\%}] respectively. The prevalence of CD and UC was 0.7{\%} [95{\%} CI 0.2{\%}-1.3{\%}] and 0.5{\%} [95{\%} CI 0.3{\%}-0.8{\%}], respectively, among patients with psoriasis. Presence of CD or UC was significantly associated with psoriasis, with OR 2.0 [95{\%} CI 1.4-2.9] and OR 1.5 [95{\%} CI 1.2-2.0], respectively. Presence of psoriasis was significantly associated with CD: OR 2.2 [95{\%} CI 1.6-3.1] and with UC: OR 1.6 [95{\%} CI 1.3-2.0]. Conclusions: We found significant bidirectional associations between psoriasis and IBD, warranting increased awareness among clinicians in the diagnostic process, especially in children and adolescents with IBD. Last, this study showed an increased frequency of paradoxical psoriasis in patients treated with biologics.",
keywords = "Crohn's disease, Psoriasis, ulcerative colitis",
author = "Farzad Alinaghi and Tekin, {Hasan G{\"o}cker} and Johan Burisch and Wu, {Jashin J} and Thyssen, {Jacob P} and Alexander Egeberg",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjz152",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "351--360",
journal = "Journal of Crohn's and Colitis",
issn = "1873-9946",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global prevalence and bidirectional association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Alinaghi, Farzad

AU - Tekin, Hasan Göcker

AU - Burisch, Johan

AU - Wu, Jashin J

AU - Thyssen, Jacob P

AU - Egeberg, Alexander

N1 - Copyright © 2019 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2020/3/13

Y1 - 2020/3/13

N2 - Background and Aims: Epidemiological studies have established an association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], i.e. ulcerative colitis [UC] and Crohn's disease [CD], but results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the prevalences and association between IBD and psoriasis. Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE were searched from database inception through April 2018 for studies reporting data on psoriasis among patients with IBD and vice versa. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate, respectively, the prevalences and association between IBD and psoriasis. Data extraction was according to the PRISMA guideline, and quality assessment was made using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The main outcomes were the proportion of psoriasis patients with IBD and vice versa, as well as the association (odds ratio [OR]) of IBD in psoriasis and psoriasis in IBD, respectively. Results: Based on quantitative analysis of 93 studies, the prevalence of psoriasis in CD and in UC was 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1%-4.6%) and 2.8% [95% CI 2.0%-3.8%] respectively. The prevalence of CD and UC was 0.7% [95% CI 0.2%-1.3%] and 0.5% [95% CI 0.3%-0.8%], respectively, among patients with psoriasis. Presence of CD or UC was significantly associated with psoriasis, with OR 2.0 [95% CI 1.4-2.9] and OR 1.5 [95% CI 1.2-2.0], respectively. Presence of psoriasis was significantly associated with CD: OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.6-3.1] and with UC: OR 1.6 [95% CI 1.3-2.0]. Conclusions: We found significant bidirectional associations between psoriasis and IBD, warranting increased awareness among clinicians in the diagnostic process, especially in children and adolescents with IBD. Last, this study showed an increased frequency of paradoxical psoriasis in patients treated with biologics.

AB - Background and Aims: Epidemiological studies have established an association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], i.e. ulcerative colitis [UC] and Crohn's disease [CD], but results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the prevalences and association between IBD and psoriasis. Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE were searched from database inception through April 2018 for studies reporting data on psoriasis among patients with IBD and vice versa. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate, respectively, the prevalences and association between IBD and psoriasis. Data extraction was according to the PRISMA guideline, and quality assessment was made using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The main outcomes were the proportion of psoriasis patients with IBD and vice versa, as well as the association (odds ratio [OR]) of IBD in psoriasis and psoriasis in IBD, respectively. Results: Based on quantitative analysis of 93 studies, the prevalence of psoriasis in CD and in UC was 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1%-4.6%) and 2.8% [95% CI 2.0%-3.8%] respectively. The prevalence of CD and UC was 0.7% [95% CI 0.2%-1.3%] and 0.5% [95% CI 0.3%-0.8%], respectively, among patients with psoriasis. Presence of CD or UC was significantly associated with psoriasis, with OR 2.0 [95% CI 1.4-2.9] and OR 1.5 [95% CI 1.2-2.0], respectively. Presence of psoriasis was significantly associated with CD: OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.6-3.1] and with UC: OR 1.6 [95% CI 1.3-2.0]. Conclusions: We found significant bidirectional associations between psoriasis and IBD, warranting increased awareness among clinicians in the diagnostic process, especially in children and adolescents with IBD. Last, this study showed an increased frequency of paradoxical psoriasis in patients treated with biologics.

KW - Crohn's disease

KW - Psoriasis

KW - ulcerative colitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85081940171&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjz152

DO - 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjz152

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 351

EP - 360

JO - Journal of Crohn's and Colitis

JF - Journal of Crohn's and Colitis

SN - 1873-9946

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 57934152