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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Five Topics Health Care Simulation Can Address to Improve Patient Safety: Results From a Consensus Process

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Implementation of an Electronic Checklist to Improve Patient Handover From Ward to Operating Room

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Identifying Facilitators and Barriers for Patient Safety in a Medicine Label Design System Using Patient Simulation and Interviews

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Medication Review and Patient Outcomes in an Orthopedic Department: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Simulation: A Tool to Detect and Traverse Boundaries

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

  2. Understanding Medication Dispensing as Done in Real Work Settings: Combining Conceptual Models and an Empirical Approach

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

  3. Improving the cost-effectiveness of laypersons' paediatric basic life support skills training: A randomised non-inferiority study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Medical dispatchers' perception of visual information in real out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a qualitative interview study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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OBJECTIVES: There is little knowledge about which elements of health care simulation are most effective in improving patient safety. When empirical evidence is lacking, a consensus statement can help define priorities in, for example, education and research. A consensus process was therefore initiated to define priorities in health care simulation that contribute the most to improve patient safety.

METHODS: An international group of experts took part in a 4-stage consensus process based on a modified nominal group technique. Stages 1 to 3 were based on electronic communication; stage 4 was a 2-day consensus meeting at the Utstein Abbey in Norway. The goals of stage 4 were to agree on the top 5 topics in health care simulation that contribute the most to patient safety, identify the patient safety problems they relate to, and suggest solutions with implementation strategies for these problems.

RESULTS: The expert group agreed on the following topics: technical skills, nontechnical skills, system probing, assessment, and effectiveness. For each topic, 5 patient safety problems were suggested that each topic might contribute to solve. Solutions to these problems and implementation strategies for these solutions were identified for technical skills, nontechnical skills, and system probing. In the case of assessment and effectiveness, the expert group found it difficult to suggest solutions and implementation strategies mainly because of lacking consensus on metrics and methodology.

CONCLUSIONS: The expert group recommends that the 5 topics identified in this consensus process should be the main focus when health care simulation is implemented in patient safety curricula.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Patient Safety
Volume15
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)111-120
ISSN1549-8417
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

ID: 46353290