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First reported adult patient with TARP syndrome: A case report

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Højland, AT, Lolas, I, Okkels, H, Lautrup, CK, Diness, BR, Petersen, MB & Nielsen, IK 2018, 'First reported adult patient with TARP syndrome: A case report' American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, vol. 176, no. 12, pp. 2915-2918. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.40638

APA

Højland, A. T., Lolas, I., Okkels, H., Lautrup, C. K., Diness, B. R., Petersen, M. B., & Nielsen, I. K. (2018). First reported adult patient with TARP syndrome: A case report. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 176(12), 2915-2918. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.40638

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MLA

Vancouver

Author

Højland, Allan T ; Lolas, Ihab ; Okkels, Henrik ; Lautrup, Charlotte K ; Diness, Birgitte R ; Petersen, Michael B ; Nielsen, Irene K. / First reported adult patient with TARP syndrome : A case report. In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A. 2018 ; Vol. 176, No. 12. pp. 2915-2918.

Bibtex

@article{335ea6f0d8614892bebe3bd8f8584c30,
title = "First reported adult patient with TARP syndrome: A case report",
abstract = "TARP syndrome (talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence, and persistence of the left superior vena cava) is a rare X-linked syndrome often resulting in pre- or post-natal lethality in affected males. In 2010, RBM10 was identified as the disease-causing gene, and we describe the first adult patient with TARP syndrome at age 28 years, hereby expanding the phenotypic spectrum. Our patient had Robin sequence, atrial septal defect, intellectual disability, scoliosis, and other findings previously associated with TARP syndrome. In addition, he had a prominent nose and nasal bridge, esotropia, displacement of lacrimal points in the cranial direction, small teeth, and chin dimple, which are the findings that have not previously been associated with TARP syndrome. Our patient was found to carry a hemizygous c.273_283delinsA RBM10 mutation in exon 4, an exon skipped in three of five protein-coding transcripts, suggesting a possible explanation for our patient surviving to adulthood. Direct sequencing of maternal DNA indicated possible mosaicism, which was confirmed by massive parallel sequencing. One of two sisters were heterozygous for the mutation. Therefore, we recommend sisters of patients with TARP syndrome be carrier tested before family planning regardless of carrier testing results of the mother. Based on our patient and previously reported patients, we suggest TARP syndrome be considered as a possible diagnosis in males with severe or profound intellectual disability combined with septal heart defect, and Robin sequence, micrognathia, or cleft palate.",
author = "H{\o}jland, {Allan T} and Ihab Lolas and Henrik Okkels and Lautrup, {Charlotte K} and Diness, {Birgitte R} and Petersen, {Michael B} and Nielsen, {Irene K}",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1002/ajmg.a.40638",
language = "English",
volume = "176",
pages = "2915--2918",
journal = "American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A",
issn = "1552-4825",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - First reported adult patient with TARP syndrome

T2 - A case report

AU - Højland, Allan T

AU - Lolas, Ihab

AU - Okkels, Henrik

AU - Lautrup, Charlotte K

AU - Diness, Birgitte R

AU - Petersen, Michael B

AU - Nielsen, Irene K

N1 - © 2018 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - TARP syndrome (talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence, and persistence of the left superior vena cava) is a rare X-linked syndrome often resulting in pre- or post-natal lethality in affected males. In 2010, RBM10 was identified as the disease-causing gene, and we describe the first adult patient with TARP syndrome at age 28 years, hereby expanding the phenotypic spectrum. Our patient had Robin sequence, atrial septal defect, intellectual disability, scoliosis, and other findings previously associated with TARP syndrome. In addition, he had a prominent nose and nasal bridge, esotropia, displacement of lacrimal points in the cranial direction, small teeth, and chin dimple, which are the findings that have not previously been associated with TARP syndrome. Our patient was found to carry a hemizygous c.273_283delinsA RBM10 mutation in exon 4, an exon skipped in three of five protein-coding transcripts, suggesting a possible explanation for our patient surviving to adulthood. Direct sequencing of maternal DNA indicated possible mosaicism, which was confirmed by massive parallel sequencing. One of two sisters were heterozygous for the mutation. Therefore, we recommend sisters of patients with TARP syndrome be carrier tested before family planning regardless of carrier testing results of the mother. Based on our patient and previously reported patients, we suggest TARP syndrome be considered as a possible diagnosis in males with severe or profound intellectual disability combined with septal heart defect, and Robin sequence, micrognathia, or cleft palate.

AB - TARP syndrome (talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence, and persistence of the left superior vena cava) is a rare X-linked syndrome often resulting in pre- or post-natal lethality in affected males. In 2010, RBM10 was identified as the disease-causing gene, and we describe the first adult patient with TARP syndrome at age 28 years, hereby expanding the phenotypic spectrum. Our patient had Robin sequence, atrial septal defect, intellectual disability, scoliosis, and other findings previously associated with TARP syndrome. In addition, he had a prominent nose and nasal bridge, esotropia, displacement of lacrimal points in the cranial direction, small teeth, and chin dimple, which are the findings that have not previously been associated with TARP syndrome. Our patient was found to carry a hemizygous c.273_283delinsA RBM10 mutation in exon 4, an exon skipped in three of five protein-coding transcripts, suggesting a possible explanation for our patient surviving to adulthood. Direct sequencing of maternal DNA indicated possible mosaicism, which was confirmed by massive parallel sequencing. One of two sisters were heterozygous for the mutation. Therefore, we recommend sisters of patients with TARP syndrome be carrier tested before family planning regardless of carrier testing results of the mother. Based on our patient and previously reported patients, we suggest TARP syndrome be considered as a possible diagnosis in males with severe or profound intellectual disability combined with septal heart defect, and Robin sequence, micrognathia, or cleft palate.

U2 - 10.1002/ajmg.a.40638

DO - 10.1002/ajmg.a.40638

M3 - Journal article

VL - 176

SP - 2915

EP - 2918

JO - American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A

JF - American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A

SN - 1552-4825

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 56213870