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Extremely prematurely born adolescents self-report of anxiety symptoms, and the mothers' reports on their offspring

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AIM: To compare anxiety symptoms in adolescents born extremely prematurely to term-born controls.

METHODS: We had 96 preterm-born adolescents and 40 term-born controls from Denmark, and their mothers score the adolescents on the Revised Children Anxiety and Depression scale. We analysed group differences, cross-informant correlations and relative risks for elevated anxiety symptoms.

RESULTS: Self-reported anxiety symptoms did not significantly differ, although the upper confidence limit (95% CI: -3.3 to 5.1) supported an odds ratio of 2 for the preterm-born participants. Mothers of the preterm-born participants reported higher social anxiety symptoms than did mothers of controls (51.7 versus 46.8, p = 0.001). The relative risk for being above a threshold indicating distressing anxiety was small from self-reports (1.39; p = 0.60). From mother-reports, the relative risk was noticeable but not significant (4.58; p = 0.14). Cross-informant scores correlated significant for total anxiety and social anxiety for the preterm-born (rτ = 0.2, p = 0.001; rτ = 0.3, p ≤ 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports did not clearly indicate more anxiety in the preterm group, although confidence intervals supported a possible twofold increase. Mother- and self-reports correlated only for the preterm group, which may indicate increased sensitivity for their children's symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa paediatrica
Volume107
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)456-461
Number of pages6
ISSN1651-2227
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 52747451