Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Early Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{b1eb1e7b2fe14adaba47dc06ea9f3605,
title = "Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Early Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage.METHODS:: This was a nationwide cohort study identifying all registered pregnancies in Denmark from 1997 to 2010. All births were identified using the Medical Birth Registry, and all records of induced abortion or miscarriage were gathered from the National Hospital Register. Data on SSRI use were gathered from the National Prescription Register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the hazard of miscarriage in women exposed to an SSRI in early pregnancy and the hazard of miscarriage in women discontinuing treatment before pregnancy.RESULTS:: We identified 1,279,840 pregnancies (911,569 births, 142,093 miscarriages, 226,178 induced abortions). Of the 22,884 exposed to an SSRI during the first 35 days of pregnancy, 12.6% (2,883) ended in miscarriage compared with 11.1% among unexposed. The adjusted hazard ratio of having a miscarriage after exposure to an SSRI was 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.33) compared with unexposed. Women discontinuing SSRI treatment 3-12 months before pregnancy also had an increased hazard ratio of having a miscarriage compared to unexposed (1.24, 95% CI 1.18-1.30).CONCLUSION:: Women exposed to SSRIs during early pregnancy were at increased risk of miscarriage as were women discontinuing SSRI treatment before pregnancy, and these risks were similar. Therefore, treatment with SSRIs during pregnancy should not be discontinued as a result of fear of miscarriage. LEVEL OF EVIEDENCE:: II.",
author = "Andersen, {Jon Tr{\ae}rup} and Andersen, {Nadia Lyhne} and Henrik Horwitz and Poulsen, {Henrik Enghusen} and Espen Jimenez-Solem",
note = "Obstetrics & Gynecology: October 2014 - Volume 124 - Issue 4 - p 655–661",
year = "2014",
month = sep,
day = "5",
doi = "10.1097/AOG.0000000000000447",
language = "English",
volume = "124",
pages = "655–661",
journal = "Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0029-7844",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Early Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage

AU - Andersen, Jon Trærup

AU - Andersen, Nadia Lyhne

AU - Horwitz, Henrik

AU - Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

AU - Jimenez-Solem, Espen

N1 - Obstetrics & Gynecology: October 2014 - Volume 124 - Issue 4 - p 655–661

PY - 2014/9/5

Y1 - 2014/9/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage.METHODS:: This was a nationwide cohort study identifying all registered pregnancies in Denmark from 1997 to 2010. All births were identified using the Medical Birth Registry, and all records of induced abortion or miscarriage were gathered from the National Hospital Register. Data on SSRI use were gathered from the National Prescription Register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the hazard of miscarriage in women exposed to an SSRI in early pregnancy and the hazard of miscarriage in women discontinuing treatment before pregnancy.RESULTS:: We identified 1,279,840 pregnancies (911,569 births, 142,093 miscarriages, 226,178 induced abortions). Of the 22,884 exposed to an SSRI during the first 35 days of pregnancy, 12.6% (2,883) ended in miscarriage compared with 11.1% among unexposed. The adjusted hazard ratio of having a miscarriage after exposure to an SSRI was 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.33) compared with unexposed. Women discontinuing SSRI treatment 3-12 months before pregnancy also had an increased hazard ratio of having a miscarriage compared to unexposed (1.24, 95% CI 1.18-1.30).CONCLUSION:: Women exposed to SSRIs during early pregnancy were at increased risk of miscarriage as were women discontinuing SSRI treatment before pregnancy, and these risks were similar. Therefore, treatment with SSRIs during pregnancy should not be discontinued as a result of fear of miscarriage. LEVEL OF EVIEDENCE:: II.

AB - OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage.METHODS:: This was a nationwide cohort study identifying all registered pregnancies in Denmark from 1997 to 2010. All births were identified using the Medical Birth Registry, and all records of induced abortion or miscarriage were gathered from the National Hospital Register. Data on SSRI use were gathered from the National Prescription Register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the hazard of miscarriage in women exposed to an SSRI in early pregnancy and the hazard of miscarriage in women discontinuing treatment before pregnancy.RESULTS:: We identified 1,279,840 pregnancies (911,569 births, 142,093 miscarriages, 226,178 induced abortions). Of the 22,884 exposed to an SSRI during the first 35 days of pregnancy, 12.6% (2,883) ended in miscarriage compared with 11.1% among unexposed. The adjusted hazard ratio of having a miscarriage after exposure to an SSRI was 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.33) compared with unexposed. Women discontinuing SSRI treatment 3-12 months before pregnancy also had an increased hazard ratio of having a miscarriage compared to unexposed (1.24, 95% CI 1.18-1.30).CONCLUSION:: Women exposed to SSRIs during early pregnancy were at increased risk of miscarriage as were women discontinuing SSRI treatment before pregnancy, and these risks were similar. Therefore, treatment with SSRIs during pregnancy should not be discontinued as a result of fear of miscarriage. LEVEL OF EVIEDENCE:: II.

U2 - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000447

DO - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000447

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25198261

VL - 124

SP - 655

EP - 661

JO - Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0029-7844

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 44554898