Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Experiences of wake and light therapy in patients with depression: A qualitative study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Kragh, Mette ; Møller, Dorthe Norden ; Wihlborg, Camilla Schultz ; Martiny, Klaus ; Larsen, Erik Roj ; Videbech, Poul ; Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove . / Experiences of wake and light therapy in patients with depression : A qualitative study. In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 170-180.

Bibtex

@article{efa8be14181147bf9fd94b410baf9215,
title = "Experiences of wake and light therapy in patients with depression: A qualitative study",
abstract = "Wake therapy can reduce depressive symptoms within days, and response rates are high. To sustain the effect, it is often combined with light therapy. Few studies have focussed on factors related to patients' adherence to the regime, and none has used qualitative methods to examine their experience of these combined interventions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to illuminate patients' experiences with wake and light therapy and factors related to adherence. Thirteen inpatients with depression were included. They participated in an intervention consisting of three wake therapies during the first week, 30 min of daily light treatment for the entire 9 weeks, and ongoing psychoeducation regarding good sleep hygiene. Patients kept a diary, and individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' overall experience with the treatment was positive. Some experienced a remarkable and rapid antidepressant effect, whereas others described more long-term benefits (e.g. improved sleep and diurnal rhythm). Yet recovery was fragile, and patients were only cautiously optimistic. Social support was important for maintaining the motivation to stay awake and receive daily light therapy. Overall, participants found the treatment worthwhile and would recommend it to others with depression. The study revealed a lack of knowledge among participants about the connection between regular sleep patterns and depression. In conclusion, this study provides insight into patients' experiences, and knowledge that can contribute to guidelines for future adherence-promoting organization of wake and light therapy.",
author = "Mette Kragh and M{\o}ller, {Dorthe Norden} and Wihlborg, {Camilla Schultz} and Klaus Martiny and Larsen, {Erik Roj} and Poul Videbech and {Lindhardt Damsgaard}, Tove",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1111/inm.12264",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "170--180",
journal = "International Journal of Mental Health Nursing",
issn = "1445-8330",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiences of wake and light therapy in patients with depression

T2 - A qualitative study

AU - Kragh, Mette

AU - Møller, Dorthe Norden

AU - Wihlborg, Camilla Schultz

AU - Martiny, Klaus

AU - Larsen, Erik Roj

AU - Videbech, Poul

AU - Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove

N1 - © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

PY - 2016/11/2

Y1 - 2016/11/2

N2 - Wake therapy can reduce depressive symptoms within days, and response rates are high. To sustain the effect, it is often combined with light therapy. Few studies have focussed on factors related to patients' adherence to the regime, and none has used qualitative methods to examine their experience of these combined interventions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to illuminate patients' experiences with wake and light therapy and factors related to adherence. Thirteen inpatients with depression were included. They participated in an intervention consisting of three wake therapies during the first week, 30 min of daily light treatment for the entire 9 weeks, and ongoing psychoeducation regarding good sleep hygiene. Patients kept a diary, and individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' overall experience with the treatment was positive. Some experienced a remarkable and rapid antidepressant effect, whereas others described more long-term benefits (e.g. improved sleep and diurnal rhythm). Yet recovery was fragile, and patients were only cautiously optimistic. Social support was important for maintaining the motivation to stay awake and receive daily light therapy. Overall, participants found the treatment worthwhile and would recommend it to others with depression. The study revealed a lack of knowledge among participants about the connection between regular sleep patterns and depression. In conclusion, this study provides insight into patients' experiences, and knowledge that can contribute to guidelines for future adherence-promoting organization of wake and light therapy.

AB - Wake therapy can reduce depressive symptoms within days, and response rates are high. To sustain the effect, it is often combined with light therapy. Few studies have focussed on factors related to patients' adherence to the regime, and none has used qualitative methods to examine their experience of these combined interventions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to illuminate patients' experiences with wake and light therapy and factors related to adherence. Thirteen inpatients with depression were included. They participated in an intervention consisting of three wake therapies during the first week, 30 min of daily light treatment for the entire 9 weeks, and ongoing psychoeducation regarding good sleep hygiene. Patients kept a diary, and individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' overall experience with the treatment was positive. Some experienced a remarkable and rapid antidepressant effect, whereas others described more long-term benefits (e.g. improved sleep and diurnal rhythm). Yet recovery was fragile, and patients were only cautiously optimistic. Social support was important for maintaining the motivation to stay awake and receive daily light therapy. Overall, participants found the treatment worthwhile and would recommend it to others with depression. The study revealed a lack of knowledge among participants about the connection between regular sleep patterns and depression. In conclusion, this study provides insight into patients' experiences, and knowledge that can contribute to guidelines for future adherence-promoting organization of wake and light therapy.

U2 - 10.1111/inm.12264

DO - 10.1111/inm.12264

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27804203

VL - 26

SP - 170

EP - 180

JO - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

JF - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

SN - 1445-8330

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 49650544