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Exercise training is associated with reduced pains from the musculoskeletal system in patients with type 2 diabetes

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@article{c0d62967205e42499c946495a7226fc7,
title = "Exercise training is associated with reduced pains from the musculoskeletal system in patients with type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Aims: To investigate the effect of exercise training on musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The intervention was exercise twice weekly for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was musculoskeletal pain assessed using a 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) in 11 body sites. Secondary outcomes were use of analgesics, glycaemic control and body weight. Results: The participants (n = 69) were 66 ± 10 years old, 38 were men and 50 completed the intervention. Pain in the limbs was more frequently reported by the participants compared to a matched general population (80.9{\%} vs 65.3{\%}, p = 0.007). The participants who had any pain at baseline (NRS > 0) and severe pain (NRS > 3) reported significantly decreased pain in the feet, calf muscles, knees, thighs, hips, lower back and arms after the training period. Use of analgesics was unchanged, HbA1c (mmol/mol) decreased from 60 ± 15 to 54 ± 11, p < 0.001 and body weight (kg) decreased from 100.5 ± 19.1 to 98.6 ± 17.7, p = 0.005. Conclusions: The participants with type 2 diabetes reported more frequent pain than a matched general population. The training intervention was associated with reduced musculoskeletal pain. Reduced pain may together with a positive impact on glycaemic control be an important motivational factor in patients with type 2 diabetes to perform exercise training.",
keywords = "Back pain, Exercise training, Intervention, Musculoskeletal pain, Numeric rating scale, Type 2 diabetes mellitus",
author = "{Munk Jensen}, Trine and {Bjerre Milling Eriksen}, Sofie and {Sedum Larsen}, Jane and Mette Aadahl and {S{\ae}tre Rasmussen}, Signe and {Bockhoff Olesen}, Louise and Thomas Rehling and Stig M{\o}lsted",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabres.2019.07.003",
language = "English",
volume = "154",
pages = "124--129",
journal = "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "0168-8227",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise training is associated with reduced pains from the musculoskeletal system in patients with type 2 diabetes

AU - Munk Jensen, Trine

AU - Bjerre Milling Eriksen, Sofie

AU - Sedum Larsen, Jane

AU - Aadahl, Mette

AU - Sætre Rasmussen, Signe

AU - Bockhoff Olesen, Louise

AU - Rehling, Thomas

AU - Mølsted, Stig

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - Aims: To investigate the effect of exercise training on musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The intervention was exercise twice weekly for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was musculoskeletal pain assessed using a 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) in 11 body sites. Secondary outcomes were use of analgesics, glycaemic control and body weight. Results: The participants (n = 69) were 66 ± 10 years old, 38 were men and 50 completed the intervention. Pain in the limbs was more frequently reported by the participants compared to a matched general population (80.9% vs 65.3%, p = 0.007). The participants who had any pain at baseline (NRS > 0) and severe pain (NRS > 3) reported significantly decreased pain in the feet, calf muscles, knees, thighs, hips, lower back and arms after the training period. Use of analgesics was unchanged, HbA1c (mmol/mol) decreased from 60 ± 15 to 54 ± 11, p < 0.001 and body weight (kg) decreased from 100.5 ± 19.1 to 98.6 ± 17.7, p = 0.005. Conclusions: The participants with type 2 diabetes reported more frequent pain than a matched general population. The training intervention was associated with reduced musculoskeletal pain. Reduced pain may together with a positive impact on glycaemic control be an important motivational factor in patients with type 2 diabetes to perform exercise training.

AB - Aims: To investigate the effect of exercise training on musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The intervention was exercise twice weekly for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was musculoskeletal pain assessed using a 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) in 11 body sites. Secondary outcomes were use of analgesics, glycaemic control and body weight. Results: The participants (n = 69) were 66 ± 10 years old, 38 were men and 50 completed the intervention. Pain in the limbs was more frequently reported by the participants compared to a matched general population (80.9% vs 65.3%, p = 0.007). The participants who had any pain at baseline (NRS > 0) and severe pain (NRS > 3) reported significantly decreased pain in the feet, calf muscles, knees, thighs, hips, lower back and arms after the training period. Use of analgesics was unchanged, HbA1c (mmol/mol) decreased from 60 ± 15 to 54 ± 11, p < 0.001 and body weight (kg) decreased from 100.5 ± 19.1 to 98.6 ± 17.7, p = 0.005. Conclusions: The participants with type 2 diabetes reported more frequent pain than a matched general population. The training intervention was associated with reduced musculoskeletal pain. Reduced pain may together with a positive impact on glycaemic control be an important motivational factor in patients with type 2 diabetes to perform exercise training.

KW - Back pain

KW - Exercise training

KW - Intervention

KW - Musculoskeletal pain

KW - Numeric rating scale

KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068970157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.diabres.2019.07.003

DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2019.07.003

M3 - Journal article

VL - 154

SP - 124

EP - 129

JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

ER -

ID: 57654216