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Exercise and cancer: from "healthy" to "therapeutic"?

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  1. The effects of targeted immune-regulatory strategies on tumor-specific T-cell responses in vitro

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  2. In vitro 4-1BB stimulation promotes expansion of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from various sarcoma subtypes

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  3. Evidence of immune elimination, immuno-editing and immune escape in patients with hematological cancer

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  4. Arginase-1-based vaccination against the tumor microenvironment: the identification of an optimal T-cell epitope

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  5. TAM-ing T cells in the tumor microenvironment: implications for TAM receptor targeting

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  1. Capsid-like particles decorated with the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain elicit strong virus neutralization activity

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  2. The capacity of CD4+ Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to kill cancer cells correlates with co-expression of CD56

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  3. Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Concurrently Kill Cancer Cells and Cross-Present Tumor Antigens

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  4. TAM Receptor Inhibition-Implications for Cancer and the Immune System

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  5. Adrenergic Signaling in Immunotherapy of Cancer: Friend or Foe?

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Exercise improves functional capacity and patient-reported outcomes across a range of cancer diagnoses. The mechanisms behind this protection have been largely unknown, but exercise-mediated changes in body composition, sex hormone levels, systemic inflammation, and immune cell function have been suggested to play a role. We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors, and a more than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Given the common mechanisms of immune cell mobilization in mouse and man during exercise, we hypothesize that this link between exercise and the immune system can be exploited in cancer therapy in particular in combination with immunotherapy. Thus, we believe that exercise may not just be "healthy" but may in fact be therapeutic.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCancer immunology, immunotherapy
Volume66
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)667-671
Number of pages5
ISSN0340-7004
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2017

    Research areas

  • Exercise, Exercise Therapy, Humans, Neoplasms, Journal Article, Review

ID: 52221612