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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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ESUR/ESUI position paper: developing artificial intelligence for precision diagnosis of prostate cancer using magnetic resonance imaging

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  • Tobias Penzkofer
  • Anwar R Padhani
  • Baris Turkbey
  • Masoom A Haider
  • Henkjan Huisman
  • Jochen Walz
  • Georg Salomon
  • Ivo G Schoots
  • Jonathan Richenberg
  • Geert Villeirs
  • Valeria Panebianco
  • Olivier Rouviere
  • Vibeke Berg Logager
  • Jelle Barentsz
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Artificial intelligence developments are essential to the successful deployment of community-wide, MRI-driven prostate cancer diagnosis. AI systems should ensure that the main benefits of biopsy avoidance are delivered while maintaining consistent high specificities, at a range of disease prevalences. Since all current artificial intelligence / computer-aided detection systems for prostate cancer detection are experimental, multiple developmental efforts are still needed to bring the vision to fruition. Initial work needs to focus on developing systems as diagnostic supporting aids so their results can be integrated into the radiologists' workflow including gland and target outlining tasks for fusion biopsies. Developing AI systems as clinical decision-making tools will require greater efforts. The latter encompass larger multicentric, multivendor datasets where the different needs of patients stratified by diagnostic settings, disease prevalence, patient preference, and clinical setting are considered. AI-based, robust, standard operating procedures will increase the confidence of patients and payers, thus enabling the wider adoption of the MRI-directed approach for prostate cancer diagnosis. KEY POINTS: • AI systems need to ensure that the benefits of biopsy avoidance are delivered with consistent high specificities, at a range of disease prevalence. • Initial work has focused on developing systems as diagnostic supporting aids for outlining tasks, so they can be integrated into the radiologists' workflow to support MRI-directed biopsies. • Decision support tools require a larger body of work including multicentric, multivendor studies where the clinical needs, disease prevalence, patient preferences, and clinical setting are additionally defined.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Radiology
Volume31
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)9567-9578
Number of pages12
ISSN0938-7994
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

© 2021. The Author(s).

    Research areas

  • Artificial Intelligence, Humans, Image-Guided Biopsy, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging

ID: 72397479