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Eruptive Melanocytic Nevi: A Review

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  1. Oversigt, diagnose og udredning af immunologiske sår

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  3. Immunologiske sår

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Eruptive melanocytic nevi (EMN) is a phenomenon characterized by the sudden onset of nevi. Our objective was to compile all published reports of EMN to identify possible precipitating factors and to evaluate the clinical appearance and course. We conducted a systematic bibliographic search and selected 93 articles, representing 179 patients with EMN. The suspected causes were skin and other diseases (50%); immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapy or melanotan (41%); and miscellaneous, including idiopathic (9%). The clinical manifestations could largely be divided into two categories: EMN associated with skin diseases were frequently few in number (fewer than ten nevi), large, and localized to the site of previous skin disease, whereas those due to other causes presented most often with multiple small widespread nevi. In general, EMN seem to persist unchanged after their appearance, but development over several years or fading has also been reported. Overall, 16% of the cases had at least one histologically confirmed dysplastic nevus. Five cases of associated melanoma were reported. We conclude that the clinical appearance of EMN may differ according to the suggested triggering factor. Based on the clinical distinction, we propose a new subclassification of EMN: (1) widespread eruptive nevi (WEN), with numerous small nevi, triggered by, for example, drugs and internal diseases, and (2) Köbner-like eruptive nevi, often with big and few nevi, associated with skin diseases and most often localized at the site of previous skin disease/trauma. The nature of the data precluded assessment of risk of malignant transformation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Volume20
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)669-682
Number of pages14
ISSN1175-0561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

ID: 59133305