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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Epidemiological factors associated with ESBL- and non ESBL-producing E. coli causing urinary tract infection in general practice

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The purpose of the study was to evaluate how use of antibiotics precedes the presence of ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice. The authors performed a triple-case-control study where three case groups were individually compared to a single control group of uninfected individuals. Urine samples were prospectively collected and retrospective statistical analyses were done. This study included 98 cases with urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, 174 with antibiotic-resistant (non-ESBL) E. coli, 177 with susceptible E. coli and 200 with culture negative urine samples. Case groups had significantly higher use of antibiotics than the control group within 30 days before infection (p < 0.0001). The ESBL group had significantly more hospital admissions than the other case groups (p < 0.05). Hospital admission was an independent risk factor for community onset UTI by ESBL-producing E. coli. Exposure to antibiotics was a risk factor for UTI with E. coli, while prior antibiotic usage was not an indisputable predictor for infection with ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInfectious diseases (London, England)
Pages (from-to)241-45
Number of pages5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

ID: 45751859