Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Environmental tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy has limited effect on infant birthweight and umbilical vein endothelial nitric oxide synthase

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. The impact of cardiovascular diseases on maternal deaths in the Nordic countries

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Breech and induction. Time for evidence-based informed consent

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  3. Maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and infertility in sons and daughters: a cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Thyroid function in COVID-19 and the association with cytokine levels and mortality

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Insulin resistance genetic risk score and burden of coronary artery disease in patients referred for coronary angiography

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Genome-wide association and Mendelian randomisation analysis provide insights into the pathogenesis of heart failure

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Coffee intake protects against symptomatic gallstone disease in the general population: a Mendelian randomization study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

INTRODUCTION: Women who smoke, deliver significantly smaller infants. These infants have reduced levels of the vasodilator endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels in the umbilical vessels, which may reduce fetal growth. Serum cotinine, the degradation product of nicotine, can be used to determine the level of tobacco exposure. Newborns of environmental smokers are suggested to be smaller and shorter in weight, length, and head circumference. eNOS levels have not yet been studied in these infants. We investigated the existence of a relation between maternal environmental tobacco smoke exposure, eNOS activity, concentration, and birthweight.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included 263 healthy singleton pregnancies categorized into three groups according to measured cotinine levels: 175 nonsmokers, 38 smokers, and 50 environmental smokers. Cotinine was quantified by mass spectrometry with a detection limit of .2 ng/mL; eNOS activity and concentration were measured in endothelial cells (ECs) of the umbilical vein.

RESULTS: Infants born to environmental smokers had similar weights to infants born to nonsmokers (47 g heavier, P = .48). Cotinine concentrations were .06/.09/.12 ng/mL (quartiles) in infants born to nonsmokers, .27/.37/.81 ng/mL in infants born to women exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, and 43.0/63.8/108.1 ng/mL in infants born to smokers. The eNOS concentration was 1.65 ± .92 ng/106 ECs (mean ± SD) in nonsmokers and 1.71 ± 1.00 ng/106 ECs in environmental smokers. The eNOS activity was 52.0 ± 20.6 pmol l-citrulline/min/106 ECs in nonsmokers and 48.7 ± 19.8 pmol l-citrulline/min/106 ECs in environmental smokers.

CONCLUSIONS: Infants born to environmental smokers, as judged by umbilical serum cotinine levels close to .2 ng/mL, are not associated with lower birthweight or reduced eNOS activity, or concentration in the fetal vascular bed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume97
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)1309-1316
Number of pages8
ISSN0001-6349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

    Research areas

  • Adult, Biomarkers/blood, Birth Weight, Female, Humans, Maternal Exposure/adverse effects, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/blood, Pregnancy, Tobacco Smoke Pollution/adverse effects, Umbilical Veins

ID: 59348256