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Environmental and Genetic Determinants of Serum 25(OH)-Vitamin D Levels during Pregnancy and Early Childhood

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@article{b2333ed680d34274bd739ef8292a247a,
title = "Environmental and Genetic Determinants of Serum 25(OH)-Vitamin D Levels during Pregnancy and Early Childhood",
abstract = "Vitamin D insufficiency has become a common health problem worldwide, particularly among pregnant women and young children. Therefore, we sought to identify environmental, dietary, and genetic determinants of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels during pregnancy and early childhood. 25(OH)D was measured in women at 24-weeks of gestation (n = 738) and one-week postpartum (n = 284) in the population-based Danish COPSAC2010 mother-child cohort; and in cord blood (n = 257) and age 4 years (n = 298) in children from the at-risk COPSAC2000 mother-child cohort. Environmental, dietary, and genetic variables were tested for association with 25(OH)D using linear regression analyses. After adjusting for season of blood sampling, determinants of lower 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy in the women were higher pre-pregnancy BMI, lower age at birth, lower genetic vitamin D score, lower dietary vitamin D intake, and lower social circumstances. In children, the determinants were lower maternal age at birth, higher pre-pregnancy BMI, lower genetic vitamin D score, older siblings, exposure to tobacco smoking, and female sex. Genetics was an important determinant at all time points, alone explaining 2%-11% of the variance in 25(OH)D. Important determinants of circulating 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy and early childhood include environmental factors, diet, and to a large extent genetics.",
author = "Schoos, {Ann-Marie Malby} and Cecilie Vinther and Sarah N{\o}rgaard and Nicklas Brustad and Jakob Stokholm and Klaus B{\o}nnelykke and Hans Bisgaard and Chawes, {Bo Lund}",
year = "2019",
month = oct,
day = "21",
doi = "10.3390/children6100116",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Children",
issn = "2227-9067",
publisher = "M D P I AG",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environmental and Genetic Determinants of Serum 25(OH)-Vitamin D Levels during Pregnancy and Early Childhood

AU - Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby

AU - Vinther, Cecilie

AU - Nørgaard, Sarah

AU - Brustad, Nicklas

AU - Stokholm, Jakob

AU - Bønnelykke, Klaus

AU - Bisgaard, Hans

AU - Chawes, Bo Lund

PY - 2019/10/21

Y1 - 2019/10/21

N2 - Vitamin D insufficiency has become a common health problem worldwide, particularly among pregnant women and young children. Therefore, we sought to identify environmental, dietary, and genetic determinants of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels during pregnancy and early childhood. 25(OH)D was measured in women at 24-weeks of gestation (n = 738) and one-week postpartum (n = 284) in the population-based Danish COPSAC2010 mother-child cohort; and in cord blood (n = 257) and age 4 years (n = 298) in children from the at-risk COPSAC2000 mother-child cohort. Environmental, dietary, and genetic variables were tested for association with 25(OH)D using linear regression analyses. After adjusting for season of blood sampling, determinants of lower 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy in the women were higher pre-pregnancy BMI, lower age at birth, lower genetic vitamin D score, lower dietary vitamin D intake, and lower social circumstances. In children, the determinants were lower maternal age at birth, higher pre-pregnancy BMI, lower genetic vitamin D score, older siblings, exposure to tobacco smoking, and female sex. Genetics was an important determinant at all time points, alone explaining 2%-11% of the variance in 25(OH)D. Important determinants of circulating 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy and early childhood include environmental factors, diet, and to a large extent genetics.

AB - Vitamin D insufficiency has become a common health problem worldwide, particularly among pregnant women and young children. Therefore, we sought to identify environmental, dietary, and genetic determinants of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels during pregnancy and early childhood. 25(OH)D was measured in women at 24-weeks of gestation (n = 738) and one-week postpartum (n = 284) in the population-based Danish COPSAC2010 mother-child cohort; and in cord blood (n = 257) and age 4 years (n = 298) in children from the at-risk COPSAC2000 mother-child cohort. Environmental, dietary, and genetic variables were tested for association with 25(OH)D using linear regression analyses. After adjusting for season of blood sampling, determinants of lower 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy in the women were higher pre-pregnancy BMI, lower age at birth, lower genetic vitamin D score, lower dietary vitamin D intake, and lower social circumstances. In children, the determinants were lower maternal age at birth, higher pre-pregnancy BMI, lower genetic vitamin D score, older siblings, exposure to tobacco smoking, and female sex. Genetics was an important determinant at all time points, alone explaining 2%-11% of the variance in 25(OH)D. Important determinants of circulating 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy and early childhood include environmental factors, diet, and to a large extent genetics.

U2 - 10.3390/children6100116

DO - 10.3390/children6100116

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31640192

VL - 6

JO - Children

JF - Children

SN - 2227-9067

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 58487700