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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Enteral Antibiotics are Non-inferior to Intravenous Antibiotics After Complicated Appendicitis in Adults: A Retrospective Multicentre Non-inferiority Study

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BACKGROUND: Prolonging post-operative antibiotic treatment beyond 3 days does not seem to reduce the incidence of post-operative abscess formation or wound infection after surgery for complicated appendicitis. The route of administration seems to be based on an empirical basis. Using enteral antibiotics could reduce length of stay and reduce overall costs. We aimed to examine whether treatment with enteral antibiotics during the first three post-operative days is non-inferior to intravenous antibiotics regarding intra-abdominal abscess formation or wound infection after surgery for complicated appendicitis.

METHODS: A retrospective study of adult patients having surgery for complicated appendicitis within a period of 32 months in the Capital Region of Denmark. Primary outcome was the incidence of post-operative abscess formation, and secondary outcome was wound infections, both within 30 days of surgery. Route of antibiotic administration for the first three post-operative days was registered for all patients.

RESULTS: A total of 1141 patients were included in the study. The overall risk of developing an intra-abdominal abscess was 6.7% (95% CI 5.2%; 8.1%), and the risk of wound infection was 1.2% (95% CI 0.6%; 1.8%). In a multivariate intention-to-treat analysis, patients treated post-operatively with enteral antibiotics had an odds ratio of 0.78 (95% CI 0.41; 1.45, p = 0.429) for developing an intra-abdominal abscess and an odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI 0.17; 4.29, p = 0.851) for developing a wound infection compared to patients treated post-operatively with intravenous antibiotics.

CONCLUSION: Treatment with enteral antibiotics was non-inferior compared to treatment with intravenous antibiotics during the first 3 days after surgery for complicated appendicitis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume41
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)2706-2714
ISSN0364-2313
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 50611000