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Ensuring Basic Competence in Thoracentesis

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DOI

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    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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BACKGROUND: Trocar pigtail catheter thoracentesis (TPCT) is a common procedure often performed by junior physicians. Simulation-based training may effectively train physicians in the procedure prior to performing it on patients. An assessment tool with solid validity evidence is necessary to ensure sufficient procedural competence.

OBJECTIVES: Our study objectives were (1) to collect evidence of validity for a newly developed pigtail catheter assessment tool (Thoracentesis Assessment Tool [ThorAT]) developed for the evaluation of TPCT performance and (2) to establish a pass/fail score for summative assessment.

METHODS: We assessed the validity evidence for the ThorAT using the recommended framework for validity by Messick. Thirty-four participants completed two consecutive procedures and their performance was assessed by two blinded, independent raters using the ThorAT. We compared performance scores to test whether the assessment tool was able to discern between the two groups, and a pass/fail score was established.

RESULTS: The assessment tool was able to discriminate between the two groups in terms of competence level. Experienced physicians received significantly higher test scores than novices in both the first and second procedure. A pass/fail score of 25.2 points was established, resulting in 4 (17%) passing novices and 1 (9%) failing experienced participant in the first procedure. In the second procedure 9 (39%) novices passed and 2 (18%) experienced participants failed.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a tool for summative assessment of competence in TPCT. Strong validity evidence was gathered from five sources of evidence. A simulation-based training program using the ThorAT could ensure competence before performing thoracentesis on patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalRespiration; international review of thoracic diseases
Volume97
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)463-471
Number of pages9
ISSN0025-7931
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 59294872