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Enhanced recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction reduces length of postoperative stay: An observational cohort study

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BACKGROUND: Enhanced recovery after surgery has been shown to lead to improved postoperative outcomes after several surgical procedures. However, only a few studies have examined the application of enhanced recovery after surgery after abdominal wall reconstruction. The aim of the current observational cohort study was to evaluate the outcomes of enhanced recovery after surgery after abdominal wall reconstruction in a large cohort.

METHOD: This was a retrospective cohort study comparing patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction in a standard care pathway (control group) with patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction in an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway. Registered outcomes included 30-day postoperative complications, length of stay, and readmission rate.

RESULTS: A total of 190 patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernias were included in the study, of which 96 were treated according to standard protocol, and 94 underwent enhanced recovery after surgery pathway. Length of stay was significantly reduced after the introduction of enhanced recovery after surgery (median 4, interquartile range 3-6 days vs. control 5, 4-7 days, P < .001). There was no difference between the cohorts in the incidence of postoperative complications requiring operative intervention (enhanced recovery after surgery 10.6% vs control 10.4%, P = 1.0) or the rate of readmissions (enhanced recovery after surgery 16.0% vs control 12.5%, P = .635).

CONCLUSION: Enhanced recovery after surgery is feasible after abdominal wall reconstruction, leading to reduced length of stay without increasing the rate of complications or readmissions. Enhanced recovery should be implemented as standard in centers performing abdominal wall reconstruction.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurgery
Volume165
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)393-397
Number of pages5
ISSN0039-6060
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 55155959