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Endogenous Testosterone Levels Are Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women without Established Comorbidity

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@article{5b483fe2b4904f70a243ede634ac81cc,
title = "Endogenous Testosterone Levels Are Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women without Established Comorbidity",
abstract = "Purpose: The impact of endogenous androgen levels on the risk of type 2 diabetes in women remains uncertain. The objective was to investigate associations between endogenous androgen levels and risk of type 2 diabetes in young women without established comorbidity.Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, women aged 18 to 50 years who underwent measurement of plasma testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) for the first time from January 2007 to December 2015 were included. Androgens were analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Women with established comorbidity were excluded, using Danish healthcare registries. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs, 95{\%} confidence intervals) of type 2 diabetes according to quartiles of plasma androgens using multivariate Poisson regression models.Results: A total of 8876 women, with a mean ± SD age of 38.5 ± 4.6 years and a median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up duration of 8.1 (6.6-9.4) years, were eligible for analyses. During 69 728 person-years, 69 women were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Women in the highest quartile of plasma total testosterone and calculated free testosterone displayed increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with the lowest quartile: IRR 1.97 (1.01; 3.85), P = .048 and IRR 7.32 (2.84; 18.83), P < .001. SHBG was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes, Q4 versus Q1; IRR 0.06 (0.02; 0.21), P < .001. Plasma DHEA-S and DHT were not associated with incident type 2 diabetes.Conclusions: Higher levels of plasma total and free testosterone were associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes among women.",
author = "Rasmussen, {Jon J} and Christian Selmer and Signe Fr{\o}ssing and Morten Schou and Jens Faber and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Gislason, {Gunnar H} and Lars K{\o}ber and Hougaard, {David M} and Cohen, {Arieh S} and Caroline Kistorp",
note = "{\circledC} Endocrine Society 2020.",
year = "2020",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/jendso/bvaa050",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "bvaa050",
journal = "Journal of the Endocrine Society",
issn = "2472-1972",
publisher = "Endocrine Society",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Endogenous Testosterone Levels Are Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women without Established Comorbidity

AU - Rasmussen, Jon J

AU - Selmer, Christian

AU - Frøssing, Signe

AU - Schou, Morten

AU - Faber, Jens

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Gislason, Gunnar H

AU - Køber, Lars

AU - Hougaard, David M

AU - Cohen, Arieh S

AU - Kistorp, Caroline

N1 - © Endocrine Society 2020.

PY - 2020/6/1

Y1 - 2020/6/1

N2 - Purpose: The impact of endogenous androgen levels on the risk of type 2 diabetes in women remains uncertain. The objective was to investigate associations between endogenous androgen levels and risk of type 2 diabetes in young women without established comorbidity.Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, women aged 18 to 50 years who underwent measurement of plasma testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) for the first time from January 2007 to December 2015 were included. Androgens were analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Women with established comorbidity were excluded, using Danish healthcare registries. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs, 95% confidence intervals) of type 2 diabetes according to quartiles of plasma androgens using multivariate Poisson regression models.Results: A total of 8876 women, with a mean ± SD age of 38.5 ± 4.6 years and a median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up duration of 8.1 (6.6-9.4) years, were eligible for analyses. During 69 728 person-years, 69 women were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Women in the highest quartile of plasma total testosterone and calculated free testosterone displayed increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with the lowest quartile: IRR 1.97 (1.01; 3.85), P = .048 and IRR 7.32 (2.84; 18.83), P < .001. SHBG was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes, Q4 versus Q1; IRR 0.06 (0.02; 0.21), P < .001. Plasma DHEA-S and DHT were not associated with incident type 2 diabetes.Conclusions: Higher levels of plasma total and free testosterone were associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes among women.

AB - Purpose: The impact of endogenous androgen levels on the risk of type 2 diabetes in women remains uncertain. The objective was to investigate associations between endogenous androgen levels and risk of type 2 diabetes in young women without established comorbidity.Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, women aged 18 to 50 years who underwent measurement of plasma testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) for the first time from January 2007 to December 2015 were included. Androgens were analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Women with established comorbidity were excluded, using Danish healthcare registries. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs, 95% confidence intervals) of type 2 diabetes according to quartiles of plasma androgens using multivariate Poisson regression models.Results: A total of 8876 women, with a mean ± SD age of 38.5 ± 4.6 years and a median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up duration of 8.1 (6.6-9.4) years, were eligible for analyses. During 69 728 person-years, 69 women were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Women in the highest quartile of plasma total testosterone and calculated free testosterone displayed increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with the lowest quartile: IRR 1.97 (1.01; 3.85), P = .048 and IRR 7.32 (2.84; 18.83), P < .001. SHBG was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes, Q4 versus Q1; IRR 0.06 (0.02; 0.21), P < .001. Plasma DHEA-S and DHT were not associated with incident type 2 diabetes.Conclusions: Higher levels of plasma total and free testosterone were associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes among women.

U2 - 10.1210/jendso/bvaa050

DO - 10.1210/jendso/bvaa050

M3 - Journal article

VL - 4

SP - bvaa050

JO - Journal of the Endocrine Society

JF - Journal of the Endocrine Society

SN - 2472-1972

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 60340380