Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Electroconvulsive therapy and later stroke in patients with affective disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Adolescent residential mobility, genetic liability and risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Evidence for oestrogen sensitivity in perinatal depression: pharmacological sex hormone manipulation study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Suicidal behaviour among persons with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and anxiety disorders as precursors of bipolar disorder onset in adulthood

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Reward processing in major depressive disorder and prediction of treatment response - Neuropharm study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Treatment-resistant depression and risk of all-cause mortality and suicidality in Danish patients with major depression

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Body mass index and height in relation to type 2 diabetes by levels of intelligence and education in a large cohort of Danish men

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Familial risk and heritability of depression by age at first diagnosis in Danish twins

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Kan prævention udløse depression?

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

View graph of relations

The long-term effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on the risk of stroke are unknown. We examined the association between ECT and risk of incident or recurrent stroke. A cohort of 174 534 patients diagnosed with affective disorder between 2005 and 2016 in the Danish National Patient Registry were followed for stroke until November 2016. The association between ECT and stroke was analysed using Cox regression with multiple adjustment and propensity-score matching on sociodemographic and clinical variables. In 162 595 patients without previous stroke, 5781 (3.6%) were treated with ECT. The total number of patients developing stroke during follow-up was 3665, of whom 165 had been treated with ECT. In patients <50 years, ECT was not associated with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.29, 95% CI 0.87-1.93). In patients ≥50, ECT was associated with a lower risk of stroke (adjusted HR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.89), but this estimate was likely influenced by competing mortality risk. Of 11 939 patients with a history of stroke, 228 (1.9%) were treated with ECT. During follow-up, 2330 (19.5%) patients had a recurrence, of which 26 were patients treated with ECT. ECT was not associated with risk of a new event (HR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.46-1.00; P = 0.05). ECT is not associated with an elevated risk of incident or recurrent stroke.Declaration of interestNone.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Volume214
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)168-170
Number of pages3
ISSN0007-1250
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

    Research areas

  • Electroconvulsive therapy, clinical neurology, epidemiology

ID: 55199433