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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Eight principles for patient-centred and family-centred care for newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit

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  1. EPICE cohort: two-year neurodevelopmental outcomes after very preterm birth

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  2. Milk feed osmolality and adverse events in newborn infants and animals: a systematic review

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  3. Breastfeeding outcomes in European NICUs: impact of parental visiting policies

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  4. Cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in term infants during postnatal transition: BabyLux project

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  1. Dansk Kvalitetsdatabase for Nyfødte (DKN) -resumé af årsrapport 2018. Indikator 9: antibiotikabehandling

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  2. Compliance with the "Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Wards" in 36 countries

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  3. Growth and breastfeeding of preterm infants receiving neonatal tele homecare compared to hospital-based care

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  4. 'Now she has become my daughter': parents' early experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants

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Despite the recent improvements in perinatal medical care leading to an increase in survival rates, adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes occur more frequently in preterm and/or high-risk infants. Medical risk factors for neurodevelopmental delays like male gender or intrauterine growth restriction and family sociocultural characteristics have been identified. Significant data have provided evidence of the detrimental impact of overhelming environmental sensory inputs, such as pain and stress, on the developing human brain and strategies aimed at preventing this impact. These strategies, such as free parental access or sleep protection, could be considered 'principles of care'. Implementation of these principles do not require additional research due to the body of evidence. We review the scientific evidence for these principles here.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Volume102
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)F364-F368
ISSN1359-2998
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

    Research areas

  • Child Development, Family Nursing, Female, Humans, Infant Care, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Newborn, Diseases, Intensive Care, Neonatal, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Patient-Centered Care, Journal Article

ID: 52590717