Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Effort-reward imbalance at work and weight changes in a nationwide cohort of workers in Denmark

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Knee osteoarthritis among airport baggage handlers: A prospective cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Asthma and respiratory symptoms among hairdressers in Denmark: Results from a register based questionnaire study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Cancer morbidity among Danish male urban bus drivers: A historical cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Implementation of new working methods in the floor-laying trade: Long-term effects on knee load and knee complaints

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Chronic productive cough and inhalant occupational exposure-a study of the general population

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Conflicting Logics in a Changing Action Space: Challenges Related to Type 1 Diabetes in Work Life

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work and subsequent weight changes.

METHODS: We included participants from a population-based cohort of workers in Denmark (mean age = 47 years, 54% women) with two (n = 9005) or three repeated measurements (n = 5710). We investigated the association between (a) ERI (ie, the mismatch between high efforts spent and low rewards received at work) at baseline and weight changes after a 2-year follow-up (defined as ≥5% increase or decrease in body mass index (BMI) vs stable), and (b) onset and remission of ERI and subsequent changes in BMI. Using multinomial logistic regression we calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for sex, age, education, cohabitation, migration background, and follow-up time.

RESULTS: After 2 years, 15% had an increase and 13% a decrease in BMI. Exposure to ERI at baseline yielded RRs of 1.09 (95% CI: 0.95-1.25) and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.90-1.20) for the increase and decrease in BMI, respectively. There were no differences between sex and baseline BMI in stratified analyses. The onset of ERI yielded RRs of 1.04 (95% CI: 0.82-1.31) and 1.15 (95% CI: 0.84-1.57) for subsequent increase and decrease in BMI. The RRs for the remission of ERI and subsequent increase and decrease in BMI were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.71-1.20) and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.53-1.13), respectively. Of the ERI components, high rewards were associated with a lower risk of BMI increase.

CONCLUSION: ERI was not a risk factor for weight changes. Future studies may investigate whether this result is generalizable to other occupational cohorts and settings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume63
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)634-643
Number of pages10
ISSN0271-3586
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

    Research areas

  • epidemiology, non-randomized experiment, obesity, observational, occupation, population-based, pseudo-trial, psychosocial work environment, stress, work

ID: 59749251