Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Effects of Gender-Affirming Hormone Therapy on Insulin Sensitivity and Incretin Responses in Transgender People

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Glycemic Control and Variability of Diabetes Secondary to Total Pancreatectomy Assessed by Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Counterregulatory responses to postprandial hypoglycemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Glucagon acutely regulates hepatic amino acid catabolism and the effect may be disturbed by steatosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The Role of Glucagon in the Acute Therapeutic Effects of SGLT2 Inhibition

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Samyah Shadid
  • Kessewa Abosi-Appeadu
  • Anne-Sophie De Maertelaere
  • Justine Defreyne
  • Laurens Veldeman
  • Jens J Holst
  • Bruno Lapauw
  • Tina Vilsbøll
  • Guy T'Sjoen
View graph of relations

OBJECTIVE: The long-term influences of sex hormone administration on insulin sensitivity and incretin hormones are controversial. We investigated these effects in 35 transgender men (TM) and 55 transgender women (TW) from the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence (ENIGI) study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Before and after 1 year of gender-affirming hormone therapy, body composition and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were evaluated. RESULTS: In TM, body weight (2.8 ± 1.0 kg; P < 0.01), fat-free mass (FFM) (3.1 ± 0.9 kg; P < 0.01), and waist-to-hip ratio (20.03 ± 0.01; P < 0.01) increased. Fasting insulin (21.4 ± 0.8 mU/L; P5 0.08) and HOMAofinsulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (2.260.3 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2; P = 0.06) tended to decrease, whereas fasting glucose (21.66 1.6 mg/dL), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) (21.8 ± 1.0 pmol/L), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) (20.2 ± 1.1 pmol/L) were statistically unchanged. Post-OGTT areas under the curve (AUCs) for GIP (2,068 ± 1,134 vs. 2,645 ± 1,248 [pmol/L]3min; P < 0.01) and GLP-1 (2,3526 796 vs. 2,71261,015 [pmol/L]3 min; P < 0.01) increased. In TW, body weight tended to increase (1.4 ± 0.8 kg; P = 0.07) with decreasing FFM (22.3 60.4 kg; P < 0.01) and waist-to-hip ratio (20.03 ± 0.01; P < 0.01). Insulin (3.4 60.8 mU/L; P < 0.01) and HOMA-IR (1.760.1 vs. 2.460.2; P < 0.01) rose, fasting GIP (21.4 ± 0.8 pmol/L; P < 0.01) and AUC GIP dropped (2,524 ± 178 vs. 1,911 ± 162 [pmol/L] 3 min; P < 0.01), but fasting glucose (20.3 ± 1.4 mg/dL), GLP-1 (1.3 ± 0.8 pmol/L), and AUC GLP-1 (2,956 ± 180 vs. 2,864 ± 93 [pmol/L] 3 min) remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of transgender persons, insulin sensitivity but also post-OGTT incretin responses tend to increase with masculinization and to decrease with feminization.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume43
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)411-417
Number of pages7
ISSN1935-5548
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

    Research areas

  • Adult, Blood Glucose/drug effects, Cohort Studies, Europe, Female, Glucagon/metabolism, Glucose Tolerance Test, Gonadal Steroid Hormones/administration & dosage, Hormone Replacement Therapy/methods, Humans, Incretins/metabolism, Insulin Resistance, Insulin Secretion/drug effects, Insulin/metabolism, Male, Prospective Studies, Sex Reassignment Procedures/methods, Time Factors, Transgender Persons, Transsexualism/chemically induced, Young Adult

ID: 58408762