Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Effect of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on bone, lean, and fat mass at six years: randomised clinical trial

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{191c20801a914bad8aac94e5b5034732,
title = "Effect of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on bone, lean, and fat mass at six years: randomised clinical trial",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of supplementation with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) in pregnancy on anthropometry and body composition in offspring.DESIGN: Double blinded, randomised controlled trial.SETTING: Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 cohort.PARTICIPANTS: 736 pregnant women and their offspring.INTERVENTION: n-3 LCPUFA (fish oil) or control (olive oil) daily from pregnancy week 24 until one week after birth.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Height/length, weight, head, and waist measurements and body composition from dual energy x ray absorptiometry (all pre-specified secondary endpoints of the n-3 LCPUFA trial; the primary outcome for the trial was persistent wheeze/asthma).RESULTS: The mean body mass index (BMI) z score was increased between age 0 and 6 years in the fish oil supplementation group compared with the control group (0.14 (95{\%} confidence interval 0.04 to 0.23); P=0.006). At 6 years, supplementation was associated with a higher BMI z score (0.19 (0.06 to 0.32); P=0.004), a higher weight/height (3.48 (0.38 to 6.57) g/cm; P=0.03), and a larger waist circumference (0.6 (0.0 to 1.2) cm; P=0.04) but not a higher proportion of obese children, using International Obesity Task Force grades. The dual energy x ray absorptiometry scan at age 6 years showed a higher total mass (395.4 (86.6 to 704.3) g; P=0.01) in the supplementation versus the control group, explained by a higher lean mass (280.7 (98.9 to 462.4) g; P=0.002), a higher bone mineral content (10.3 (2.3 to 18.1) g; P=0.01), and a non-significantly higher fat mass (116.3 (-92.9 to 325.5) g; P=0.28), but no differences were seen in total body fat or lean mass percentage.CONCLUSION: Fish oil supplementation from the 24th week of pregnancy led to a higher BMI in the offspring from 0 to 6 years of age but not an increased risk of obesity at age 6. The body composition at age 6 years in children given fish oil supplementation was characterised by a proportional increase in lean, bone, and fat mass suggesting a general growth stimulating effect of n-3 LCPUFA.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00798226.",
author = "Vinding, {Rebecca Kofod} and Jakob Stokholm and Astrid Sevelsted and Tobias Sejersen and Chawes, {Bo L} and Klaus B{\o}nnelykke and Jonathan Thorsen and Howe, {Laura D} and Martin Krakauer and Hans Bisgaard",
note = "Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "362",
pages = "k3312",
journal = "BMJ",
issn = "1756-1833",
publisher = "B M J Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on bone, lean, and fat mass at six years

T2 - randomised clinical trial

AU - Vinding, Rebecca Kofod

AU - Stokholm, Jakob

AU - Sevelsted, Astrid

AU - Sejersen, Tobias

AU - Chawes, Bo L

AU - Bønnelykke, Klaus

AU - Thorsen, Jonathan

AU - Howe, Laura D

AU - Krakauer, Martin

AU - Bisgaard, Hans

N1 - Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

PY - 2018/9/4

Y1 - 2018/9/4

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of supplementation with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) in pregnancy on anthropometry and body composition in offspring.DESIGN: Double blinded, randomised controlled trial.SETTING: Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 cohort.PARTICIPANTS: 736 pregnant women and their offspring.INTERVENTION: n-3 LCPUFA (fish oil) or control (olive oil) daily from pregnancy week 24 until one week after birth.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Height/length, weight, head, and waist measurements and body composition from dual energy x ray absorptiometry (all pre-specified secondary endpoints of the n-3 LCPUFA trial; the primary outcome for the trial was persistent wheeze/asthma).RESULTS: The mean body mass index (BMI) z score was increased between age 0 and 6 years in the fish oil supplementation group compared with the control group (0.14 (95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.23); P=0.006). At 6 years, supplementation was associated with a higher BMI z score (0.19 (0.06 to 0.32); P=0.004), a higher weight/height (3.48 (0.38 to 6.57) g/cm; P=0.03), and a larger waist circumference (0.6 (0.0 to 1.2) cm; P=0.04) but not a higher proportion of obese children, using International Obesity Task Force grades. The dual energy x ray absorptiometry scan at age 6 years showed a higher total mass (395.4 (86.6 to 704.3) g; P=0.01) in the supplementation versus the control group, explained by a higher lean mass (280.7 (98.9 to 462.4) g; P=0.002), a higher bone mineral content (10.3 (2.3 to 18.1) g; P=0.01), and a non-significantly higher fat mass (116.3 (-92.9 to 325.5) g; P=0.28), but no differences were seen in total body fat or lean mass percentage.CONCLUSION: Fish oil supplementation from the 24th week of pregnancy led to a higher BMI in the offspring from 0 to 6 years of age but not an increased risk of obesity at age 6. The body composition at age 6 years in children given fish oil supplementation was characterised by a proportional increase in lean, bone, and fat mass suggesting a general growth stimulating effect of n-3 LCPUFA.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00798226.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of supplementation with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) in pregnancy on anthropometry and body composition in offspring.DESIGN: Double blinded, randomised controlled trial.SETTING: Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 cohort.PARTICIPANTS: 736 pregnant women and their offspring.INTERVENTION: n-3 LCPUFA (fish oil) or control (olive oil) daily from pregnancy week 24 until one week after birth.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Height/length, weight, head, and waist measurements and body composition from dual energy x ray absorptiometry (all pre-specified secondary endpoints of the n-3 LCPUFA trial; the primary outcome for the trial was persistent wheeze/asthma).RESULTS: The mean body mass index (BMI) z score was increased between age 0 and 6 years in the fish oil supplementation group compared with the control group (0.14 (95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.23); P=0.006). At 6 years, supplementation was associated with a higher BMI z score (0.19 (0.06 to 0.32); P=0.004), a higher weight/height (3.48 (0.38 to 6.57) g/cm; P=0.03), and a larger waist circumference (0.6 (0.0 to 1.2) cm; P=0.04) but not a higher proportion of obese children, using International Obesity Task Force grades. The dual energy x ray absorptiometry scan at age 6 years showed a higher total mass (395.4 (86.6 to 704.3) g; P=0.01) in the supplementation versus the control group, explained by a higher lean mass (280.7 (98.9 to 462.4) g; P=0.002), a higher bone mineral content (10.3 (2.3 to 18.1) g; P=0.01), and a non-significantly higher fat mass (116.3 (-92.9 to 325.5) g; P=0.28), but no differences were seen in total body fat or lean mass percentage.CONCLUSION: Fish oil supplementation from the 24th week of pregnancy led to a higher BMI in the offspring from 0 to 6 years of age but not an increased risk of obesity at age 6. The body composition at age 6 years in children given fish oil supplementation was characterised by a proportional increase in lean, bone, and fat mass suggesting a general growth stimulating effect of n-3 LCPUFA.TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00798226.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 362

SP - k3312

JO - BMJ

JF - BMJ

SN - 1756-1833

ER -

ID: 55159848