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Effect of blood-flow restricted vs. heavy-load strength training on muscle strength: Systematic review and meta-analysis

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@article{7caa6e48b9204f1fb316efb054348935,
title = "Effect of blood-flow restricted vs. heavy-load strength training on muscle strength: Systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Heavy-load strength training (HLT) is generally considered the Gold Standard exercise modality for inducing gains in skeletal muscle strength. However, use of heavy external exercise loads may be contraindicative in frail individuals. Low-load resistance exercise combined with partial blood-flow restriction (LL-BFR exercise) may offer an effective alternative for increasing mechanical muscle strength and size. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of LL-BFR training to HLT on maximal muscle strength gains. Prospero registration-id (CRD42014013382).MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic search in six healthcare science databases and reference lists was conducted. Data selected for primary analysis consisted of post-intervention changes in maximal muscle strength. A random-effects meta-analysis with standardized mean differences (SMD) was used.RESULTS: Of 1413 papers identified through systematic search routines, sixteen papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria, totalling 153 participants completing HLT and 157 completing LL-BFR training. The magnitude of training-induced gains in maximal muscle strength did not differ between LL-BFR training and HLT (SMD of -0.17 (95{\%} CI: -0.40; 0.05)). Low between-study heterogeneity was noted (I 2 = 0.0{\%}, Chi 2 P = 9.65). CONCLUSION: Low-load blood-flow-restricted training appears equally effective of producing gains in maximal voluntary muscle strength compared to HLT in 20- to 80-year-old healthy and habitually active adults.",
keywords = "BFR, blood-flow restriction, high-load exercise, HLT, muscle strength, occlusion training, resistance exercise, strength training, Constriction, Humans, Regional Blood Flow, Resistance Training/methods, Extremities/blood supply, Muscle Strength",
author = "Gr{\o}nfeldt, {Birk Mygind} and {Lindberg Nielsen}, Jakob and Mieritz, {Rune Mygind} and Hans Lund and Per Aagaard",
note = "{\circledC} 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/sms.13632",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "837--848",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports",
issn = "0905-7188",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of blood-flow restricted vs. heavy-load strength training on muscle strength

T2 - Systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Grønfeldt, Birk Mygind

AU - Lindberg Nielsen, Jakob

AU - Mieritz, Rune Mygind

AU - Lund, Hans

AU - Aagaard, Per

N1 - © 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2020/5/1

Y1 - 2020/5/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Heavy-load strength training (HLT) is generally considered the Gold Standard exercise modality for inducing gains in skeletal muscle strength. However, use of heavy external exercise loads may be contraindicative in frail individuals. Low-load resistance exercise combined with partial blood-flow restriction (LL-BFR exercise) may offer an effective alternative for increasing mechanical muscle strength and size. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of LL-BFR training to HLT on maximal muscle strength gains. Prospero registration-id (CRD42014013382).MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic search in six healthcare science databases and reference lists was conducted. Data selected for primary analysis consisted of post-intervention changes in maximal muscle strength. A random-effects meta-analysis with standardized mean differences (SMD) was used.RESULTS: Of 1413 papers identified through systematic search routines, sixteen papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria, totalling 153 participants completing HLT and 157 completing LL-BFR training. The magnitude of training-induced gains in maximal muscle strength did not differ between LL-BFR training and HLT (SMD of -0.17 (95% CI: -0.40; 0.05)). Low between-study heterogeneity was noted (I 2 = 0.0%, Chi 2 P = 9.65). CONCLUSION: Low-load blood-flow-restricted training appears equally effective of producing gains in maximal voluntary muscle strength compared to HLT in 20- to 80-year-old healthy and habitually active adults.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Heavy-load strength training (HLT) is generally considered the Gold Standard exercise modality for inducing gains in skeletal muscle strength. However, use of heavy external exercise loads may be contraindicative in frail individuals. Low-load resistance exercise combined with partial blood-flow restriction (LL-BFR exercise) may offer an effective alternative for increasing mechanical muscle strength and size. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of LL-BFR training to HLT on maximal muscle strength gains. Prospero registration-id (CRD42014013382).MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic search in six healthcare science databases and reference lists was conducted. Data selected for primary analysis consisted of post-intervention changes in maximal muscle strength. A random-effects meta-analysis with standardized mean differences (SMD) was used.RESULTS: Of 1413 papers identified through systematic search routines, sixteen papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria, totalling 153 participants completing HLT and 157 completing LL-BFR training. The magnitude of training-induced gains in maximal muscle strength did not differ between LL-BFR training and HLT (SMD of -0.17 (95% CI: -0.40; 0.05)). Low between-study heterogeneity was noted (I 2 = 0.0%, Chi 2 P = 9.65). CONCLUSION: Low-load blood-flow-restricted training appears equally effective of producing gains in maximal voluntary muscle strength compared to HLT in 20- to 80-year-old healthy and habitually active adults.

KW - BFR

KW - blood-flow restriction

KW - high-load exercise

KW - HLT

KW - muscle strength

KW - occlusion training

KW - resistance exercise

KW - strength training

KW - Constriction

KW - Humans

KW - Regional Blood Flow

KW - Resistance Training/methods

KW - Extremities/blood supply

KW - Muscle Strength

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85083533679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/sms.13632

DO - 10.1111/sms.13632

M3 - Journal article

VL - 30

SP - 837

EP - 848

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports

SN - 0905-7188

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 59267193