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Effect of aging and exercise on the tendon

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  1. The influence of direct and indirect fibroblast cell contact on human myogenic cell behavior and gene expression in vitro

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  2. Mechanical properties, physiological behavior, and function of aponeurosis and tendon

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  3. Plasma Free Fatty Acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise

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  4. Effects of active commuting and leisure-time exercise on appetite in individuals with overweight and obesity

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  1. Maintenance of muscle strength following a one-year resistance training program in older adults

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  2. The influence of prolonged strength training upon muscle and fat in healthy and chronically diseased older adults

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  3. Associations between shoulder symptoms and concomitant pathology in patients with traumatic supraspinatus tears

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  4. The effect of 4 months exercise training on systemic biomarkers of cartilage and bone turnover in hip osteoarthritis patients

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  5. Early development of tendinopathy in humans: Sequence of pathological changes in structure and tissue turnover signaling

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Here, we review the literature on how tendons respond and adapt to ageing and exercise. With respect to aging, there are considerable changes early in life, but this seems to be maturation rather than aging per se. In vitro data indicate that aging is associated with a decreased potential for cell proliferation and a reduction in the number of stem/progenitor-like cells. Further, there is persuasive evidence that turnover in the core of the tendon after maturity is very slow or absent. Tendon fibril diameter, collagen content, and whole tendon size appear to be largely unchanged with aging, while glycation-derived cross-links increase substantially. Mechanically, aging appears to be associated with a reduction in modulus and strength. With respect to exercise, tendon cells respond by producing growth factors, and there is some support for a loading-induced increase in tendon collagen synthesis in humans, which likely reflects synthesis at the very periphery of the tendon rather than the core. Average collagen fibril diameter is largely unaffected by exercise, while there can be some hypertrophy of the whole tendon. In addition, it seems that resistance training can yield increased stiffness and modulus of the tendon and may reduce the amount of glycation. Exercise thereby tends to counteract the effects of aging.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Volume121
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)1353-1362
Number of pages10
ISSN0161-7567
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

ID: 49639594