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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Early life body size and its associations with adult bladder cancer

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  1. Birth weight, childhood body mass index and height and risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis

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  2. Cardiovascular risk factors in rural Kenyans are associated with differential age gradients, but not modified by sex or ethnicity

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  3. Changes in body water distribution during treatment with inhaled steroid in pre-school children

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  1. Associations of childhood BMI and change in BMI from childhood to adulthood with risks of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

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  2. Association of Birth Weight, Childhood Body Mass Index, and Height With Risk of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

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  3. Possible Modifiers of the Association Between Change in Weight Status From Child Through Adult Ages and Later Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

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  4. Birth weight, childhood body mass index and height and risks of endometriosis and adenomyosis

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Background: Adult overweight is a potential bladder cancer (BC) risk factor, but little is known about size earlier in life.Aim: To investigate if birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI), height and growth are associated with adult BC.Subjects and methods: Anthropometric information from birth and ages 7-13 on 315,763 individuals born 1930-1989 in the Copenhagen School Health Records Register was linked to national registers. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox regression.Results: 1145 individuals (839 men) were diagnosed with BC. Sex differences were not detected. Childhood BMI had positive associations and height had inverse associations with BC; at age 13, HR = 1.10 (95% CI: 1.02-1.18) per BMI z-score and HR = 0.94 (95% CI: 0.89-1.00) per height z-score. A pattern of above-average increases in BMI from 7 to 13 years had higher hazards of BC than average increases. Above-average growth in height was not significantly associated with BC. Compared with birth weights of 3.5 kg, low (2.5 kg) and high (4.5 kg) values were associated with increased hazards of BC; HR = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.01-1.58) and HR = 1.36 (95% CI: 1.09-1.70), respectively.Conclusions: A high BMI, a short height, excess BMI gain in childhood and low and high birth weights are associated with increased hazards of BC.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Human Biology
Volume47
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)166-172
Number of pages7
ISSN0301-4460
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

ID: 60053550