Early Clinical and Radiological Experience with a Ceramic Bone Graft Substitute in the Treatment of Benign and Borderline Bone Lesions

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Substitutes for bone grafts experience increasing popularity, but the need for defect-filling following simple curettage of benign bone lesions is controversial. In this study, we wish to objectively report the radiological changes following bone defect-filling using a composite ceramic bone graft substitute, as well as the clinical results and complications. We evaluated 35 surgically treated benign bone lesions with subsequent defect-filling using two variants of a composite ceramic bone graft substitute (CERAMENT|BONE VOID FILLER or CERAMENT|G, BONESUPPORT AB, SWEDEN). After one year, a normal cortical thickness surrounding the defect was seen in approximately 80% of patients. Inside the defect-cavity, an almost complete product-resorption was seen after one year. The most common complication was a post-operative inflammatory soft-tissue reaction, seen in 7 patients (20%), which resolved without further treatment, although short-term antibiotic treatment was initiated at a local hospital in 6 patients, due to suspected wound infection. In summary, cortical thickness most commonly normalizes after bone tumor removal and filling of the bone defect using this particular composite ceramic bone graft substitute. The ceramic substitute undergoes resorption, which causes progressive changes in the radiological appearance inside the bone defect.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)15384
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Early Clinical and Radiological Experience with a Ceramic Bone Graft Substitute in the Treatment of Benign and Borderline Bone Lesions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this