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Dyslipidemia at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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@article{3e5b3ca0dc564b9f8d98653027f86c4a,
title = "Dyslipidemia at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia",
abstract = "As survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) exceeds 90%, limiting therapy-related toxicity has become a key challenge. Cardio-metabolic dysfunction is a challenge during and after childhood ALL therapy. In a single center study, we measured triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high (HDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) levels at diagnosis and assessed the association with BMI, early therapy response, on-therapy hyperlipidemia and the toxicities; thromboembolism, osteonecrosis and pancreatitis. We included 127 children (1.0-17.9 years) all treated according to the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol. Dyslipidemia was identified at ALL-diagnosis in 99% of the patients, dominated by reduced HDL levels (98%) and mild hypertriglyceridemia (61%). Hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with body mass index (P = 0.71). Five percent of patients had mild hypercholesterolemia, 14% had mild hypocholesterolemia, 13% had decreased and 1% elevated LDL-levels. Increased TG and TC levels at ALL-diagnosis were not associated with any on-therapy lipid levels. Lipid levels and BMI were not associated to MRD after induction therapy; However, BMI and hypercholesterolemia were associated with worse risk group stratification (P<0.045 for all). The cumulative incidence of thromboembolism was increased both for patients with hypo- (20.0%) and hypercholesterolemia (16.7%) compared to patients with normal TC levels (2.2%) at diagnosis (P = 0.0074). In conclusion, dyslipidemic changes were present prior to ALL-therapy in children with ALL but did not seem to affect dysmetabolic traits during therapy and were not predictive of on-therapy toxicities apart from an association between dyscholesterolemia at time of ALL-diagnosis and risk of thromboembolism. However, the latter should be interpreted with caution due to low number in the groups.",
author = "Mogensen, {Pernille Rudebeck} and Kathrine Grell and Kjeld Schmiegelow and Overgaard, {Ulrik Malthe} and Wolthers, {Benjamin Ole} and Mogensen, {Signe Sloth} and Allan Vaag and Frandsen, {Thomas Leth}",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0231209",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "PLOS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dyslipidemia at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

AU - Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck

AU - Grell, Kathrine

AU - Schmiegelow, Kjeld

AU - Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe

AU - Wolthers, Benjamin Ole

AU - Mogensen, Signe Sloth

AU - Vaag, Allan

AU - Frandsen, Thomas Leth

PY - 2020/4/6

Y1 - 2020/4/6

N2 - As survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) exceeds 90%, limiting therapy-related toxicity has become a key challenge. Cardio-metabolic dysfunction is a challenge during and after childhood ALL therapy. In a single center study, we measured triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high (HDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) levels at diagnosis and assessed the association with BMI, early therapy response, on-therapy hyperlipidemia and the toxicities; thromboembolism, osteonecrosis and pancreatitis. We included 127 children (1.0-17.9 years) all treated according to the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol. Dyslipidemia was identified at ALL-diagnosis in 99% of the patients, dominated by reduced HDL levels (98%) and mild hypertriglyceridemia (61%). Hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with body mass index (P = 0.71). Five percent of patients had mild hypercholesterolemia, 14% had mild hypocholesterolemia, 13% had decreased and 1% elevated LDL-levels. Increased TG and TC levels at ALL-diagnosis were not associated with any on-therapy lipid levels. Lipid levels and BMI were not associated to MRD after induction therapy; However, BMI and hypercholesterolemia were associated with worse risk group stratification (P<0.045 for all). The cumulative incidence of thromboembolism was increased both for patients with hypo- (20.0%) and hypercholesterolemia (16.7%) compared to patients with normal TC levels (2.2%) at diagnosis (P = 0.0074). In conclusion, dyslipidemic changes were present prior to ALL-therapy in children with ALL but did not seem to affect dysmetabolic traits during therapy and were not predictive of on-therapy toxicities apart from an association between dyscholesterolemia at time of ALL-diagnosis and risk of thromboembolism. However, the latter should be interpreted with caution due to low number in the groups.

AB - As survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) exceeds 90%, limiting therapy-related toxicity has become a key challenge. Cardio-metabolic dysfunction is a challenge during and after childhood ALL therapy. In a single center study, we measured triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high (HDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) levels at diagnosis and assessed the association with BMI, early therapy response, on-therapy hyperlipidemia and the toxicities; thromboembolism, osteonecrosis and pancreatitis. We included 127 children (1.0-17.9 years) all treated according to the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol. Dyslipidemia was identified at ALL-diagnosis in 99% of the patients, dominated by reduced HDL levels (98%) and mild hypertriglyceridemia (61%). Hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with body mass index (P = 0.71). Five percent of patients had mild hypercholesterolemia, 14% had mild hypocholesterolemia, 13% had decreased and 1% elevated LDL-levels. Increased TG and TC levels at ALL-diagnosis were not associated with any on-therapy lipid levels. Lipid levels and BMI were not associated to MRD after induction therapy; However, BMI and hypercholesterolemia were associated with worse risk group stratification (P<0.045 for all). The cumulative incidence of thromboembolism was increased both for patients with hypo- (20.0%) and hypercholesterolemia (16.7%) compared to patients with normal TC levels (2.2%) at diagnosis (P = 0.0074). In conclusion, dyslipidemic changes were present prior to ALL-therapy in children with ALL but did not seem to affect dysmetabolic traits during therapy and were not predictive of on-therapy toxicities apart from an association between dyscholesterolemia at time of ALL-diagnosis and risk of thromboembolism. However, the latter should be interpreted with caution due to low number in the groups.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85082950437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0231209

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0231209

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32251440

VL - 15

JO - PLOS ONE

JF - PLOS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

M1 - e0231209

ER -

ID: 59637043