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Dynamic cerebral autoregulation during early orthostatic exercise in patients with severe traumatic brain injury: Further exploratory analyses from a randomized clinical feasibility trial

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In patients with severe traumatic brain injury, there is limited evidence of the clinical effect of early orthostatic exercise, although such exercise may strengthen systemic or cerebral hemodynamic responses to head-up tilt, thereby minimizing orthostatic intolerance. We measured dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) and the occurrence of orthostatic intolerance after four weeks of regular orthostatic exercise by head-up tilt using a tilt table with integrated stepping using the ERIGO® tilt-table and comparing it to standard care. Thirty-four patients with severe traumatic brain injury admitted to a neurocritical care unit were included in this randomized clinical trial. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv), non-invasive mean arterial pressure, heart rate and PaCO2 were recorded; dCA was measured by the non-invasive mean flow index (nMxa). Transition from the supine position to head-up tilt triggered a 10-16% decrease in MCAv and increased nMxa in both groups at all time points (P < 0.05), with no differences between groups. There was no difference in the number of episodes with orthostatic intolerance (5 vs 3; 1 vs 2; 1 vs 0) at baseline, two weeks and four weeks, respectively, and no association between changes in PaCO2-adjusted nMxa and the occurrence of orthostatic reactions (P = 0.35). Early orthostatic exercise does not affect dynamic cerebral autoregulation and does not protect against orthostatic intolerance in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02924649. Registered on 3rd October 2016.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Volume92
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
ISSN0967-5868
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

    Research areas

  • Dynamic cerebral autoregulation, Early mobilization, Head-up tilt test, Orthostatic intolerance, Traumatic brain injury

ID: 67611617