Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Does pericentral mu-rhythm "power" corticomotor excitability? - a matter of EEG perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Estimation of individually induced e-field strength during transcranial electric stimulation using the head circumference

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Safety Evaluation of a New Setup for Transcranial Electric Stimulation during Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation with high spatial resolution

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Guidelines for TMS/tES Clinical Services and Research through the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Ergodicity-breaking reveals time optimal decision making in humans

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Using MR elastography to assess portal hypertension and response to beta-blockers in patients with cirrhosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Dimethyl Fumarate Treatment in Patients With Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Electroencephalography (EEG) and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) of the primary motor hand area (M1-HAND) have been combined to explore whether the instantaneous expression of pericentral mu-rhythm drives fluctuations in corticomotor excitability, but this line of research has yielded diverging results.

OBJECTIVES: To re-assess the relationship between the mu-rhythm power expressed in left pericentral cortex and the amplitude of motor potentials (MEP) evoked with spTMS in left M1-HAND.

METHODS: 15 non-preselected healthy young participants received spTMS to the motor hot spot of left M1-HAND. Regional expression of mu-rhythm was estimated online based on a radial source at motor hotspot and informed the timing of spTMS which was applied either during epochs belonging to the highest or lowest quartile of regionally expressed mu-power. Using MEP amplitude as dependent variable, we computed a linear mixed-effects model, which included mu-power and mu-phase at the time of stimulation and the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) as fixed effects and subject as a random effect. Mu-phase was estimated by post-hoc sorting of trials into four discrete phase bins. We performed a follow-up analysis on the same EEG-triggered MEP data set in which we isolated mu-power at the sensor level using a Laplacian montage centered on the electrode above the M1-HAND.

RESULTS: Pericentral mu-power traced as radial source at motor hot spot did not significantly modulate the MEP, but mu-power determined by the surface Laplacian did, showing a positive relation between mu-power and MEP amplitude. In neither case, there was an effect of mu-phase on MEP amplitude.

CONCLUSION: The relationship between cortical oscillatory activity and cortical excitability is complex and minor differences in the methodological choices may critically affect sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain Stimulation
Volume14
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)713-722
Number of pages10
ISSN1935-861X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Copyright:
This record is sourced from MEDLINE/PubMed, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

    Research areas

  • Brain-state dependent TMS, Gating-by-inhibition, Pericentral mu-rhymth, TMS-EEG

ID: 64828947