Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Do people improve health behavior after their partner is diagnosed with cancer? A prospective study in the Danish diet, Cancer and Health Cohort

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Difficult journeys in sarcoma care; socioeconomic disparity added to the multiple challenges of a rare tumor diagnosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Agreement between the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Meet the Acta Oncologica editorial board

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Glioma risk associated with extent of estimated European genetic ancestry in African Americans and Hispanics

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Psychological stress in long-term testicular cancer survivors: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. A Weighted Genetic Risk Score of Adult Glioma Susceptibility Loci Associated with Pediatric Brain Tumor Risk

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Nicole P M Ezendam
  • Randi V Karlsen
  • Jane Christensen
  • Anne Tjønneland
  • Lonneke V van de Poll-Franse
  • Annika von Heymann-Horan
  • Christoffer Johansen
  • Pernille E Bidstrup
View graph of relations

Background: The cancer diagnosis is regarded as a stressful life event that is thought to trigger a teachable moment to induce health behavior changes among cancer patients. However, this may also hold true for their partners. We assessed if partners of cancer patients make more health behavior changes compared to persons whose partner remained cancer-free. Methods: Lifestyles was assessed in the prospective Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess health behavior change among partners of cancer patients (n = 672) compared to partners of persons who remained cancer-free (n = 5534). Additionally, associations in two subgroups were assessed: bereaved partners and partners of patients who remained alive after cancer. Results: Partners of cancer patients were more likely to decrease their alcohol intake compared to partners of persons who remained cancer free. This finding could mainly be attributed to bereaved partners. Moreover, bereaved partners were also more likely to decrease their BMI. In contrast to our hypothesis, bereaved partners were more likely to decrease fruit intake and increase sugared beverages compared to partners of persons who remained cancer free. In general, men tended to improve their physical activity, while women tended to worsen their physical activity following the cancer diagnosis of their partner. Conclusions: A cancer diagnosis in the partner does seem to improve health behavior change only for alcohol intake. Bereaved partners tend to worsen dietary behaviors after the patient's death.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa oncologica
Volume58
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)700-707
Number of pages8
ISSN0284-186X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2019

ID: 57383849