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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Disordered eating behaviours and autistic traits-Are there any associations in nonclinical populations? A systematic review

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  1. Diagnosed Anxiety Disorders and the Risk of Subsequent Anorexia Nervosa: A Danish Population Register Study

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  2. Cognitive Profile of Children and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

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  3. Disgust sensitivity and anorexia nervosa

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  1. Problems of feeding, sleeping and excessive crying in infancy: a general population study

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  2. Five-Year Change in Choroidal Thickness in Relation to Body Development and Axial Eye Elongation: The CCC2000 Eye Study

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  3. Psychotic experiences are associated with health anxiety and functional somatic symptoms in preadolescence

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OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to critically review existing literature concerning the possible association between autistic-like behaviours and problematic eating behaviours in nonclinical populations.

METHOD: We performed a systematic literature search in three large databases. Studies were included if they assessed any association between a broad range of autistic-like behaviours and problematic eating behaviours in nonclinical samples.

RESULTS: Sixteen eligible studies were found covering 3,595 participants in total, including five studies on children/adolescents (n = 685). All studies were cross-sectional, and thus, only concurrent associations could be evaluated. Several autistic-like behaviours were found to be associated with problematic eating behaviours, with the overall "autism spectrum quotient," deficiencies in set-shifting, and theory of mind showing the strongest associations.

CONCLUSIONS: The existing literature indicates concurrent associations between specific autistic-like behaviours and problematic eating behaviours in nonclinical samples across ages. Large prospective longitudinal studies are needed for insight into the temporal order of these associations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association
Volume27
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)8-23
Number of pages16
ISSN1072-4133
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

ID: 55820088