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Discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with first-episode schizophrenia and its association to functional outcomes, hospitalization and death: a register-based nationwide follow-up study

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@article{75515e308f454d8f98b3ac8443fb5922,
title = "Discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with first-episode schizophrenia and its association to functional outcomes, hospitalization and death: a register-based nationwide follow-up study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Discontinuation of antipsychotic medication may be linked to high risk of relapse, hospitalization and mortality. This study investigated the use and discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with first-episode schizophrenia in relation to cohabitation, living with children, employment, hospital admission and death.METHODS: Danish registers were used to establish a nationwide cohort of individuals ⩾18 years with schizophrenia included at the time of diagnosis in1995-2013. Exposure was antipsychotic medication calculated using defined daily dose and redeemed prescriptions year 2-5. Outcomes year 5-6 were analysed using binary logistic, negative binomial and Cox proportional hazard regression.RESULTS: Among 21 351, 9.3% took antipsychotics continuously year 2-5, 38.6% took no antipsychotics, 3.4% sustained discontinuation and 48.7% discontinued and resumed treatment. At follow-up year 6, living with children or employment was significantly higher in individuals with sustained discontinuation (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.53-2.56 and OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.91-3.54), non-sustained discontinuation (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.48 and 2.04, 95% CI 1.64-2.53) and no antipsychotics (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.69-2.38 and 5.64, 95% CI 4.56-6.97) compared to continuous users. Individuals with non-sustained discontinuation had more psychiatric hospital admissions (IRR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.47) and longer admissions (IRR 1.68, 95% CI 1.30-2.16) year 5-6 compared to continuous users. Mortality during year 5-6 did not differ between groups.CONCLUSION: Most individuals with first-episode schizophrenia discontinued or took no antipsychotics the first years after diagnosis and had better functional outcomes. Non-sustained discontinuers had more, and longer admissions compared to continuous users. However, associations found could be either cause or effect.",
author = "St{\"u}rup, {Anne Emilie} and Merete Nordentoft and Espen Jimenez-Solem and Merete Osler and Davy, {Josefine Winther} and Christensen, {Thomas Nordahl} and Helene Speyer and Nikolai Albert and Carsten Hjorth{\o}j",
year = "2022",
month = jul,
day = "12",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291722002021",
language = "English",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with first-episode schizophrenia and its association to functional outcomes, hospitalization and death

T2 - a register-based nationwide follow-up study

AU - Stürup, Anne Emilie

AU - Nordentoft, Merete

AU - Jimenez-Solem, Espen

AU - Osler, Merete

AU - Davy, Josefine Winther

AU - Christensen, Thomas Nordahl

AU - Speyer, Helene

AU - Albert, Nikolai

AU - Hjorthøj, Carsten

PY - 2022/7/12

Y1 - 2022/7/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Discontinuation of antipsychotic medication may be linked to high risk of relapse, hospitalization and mortality. This study investigated the use and discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with first-episode schizophrenia in relation to cohabitation, living with children, employment, hospital admission and death.METHODS: Danish registers were used to establish a nationwide cohort of individuals ⩾18 years with schizophrenia included at the time of diagnosis in1995-2013. Exposure was antipsychotic medication calculated using defined daily dose and redeemed prescriptions year 2-5. Outcomes year 5-6 were analysed using binary logistic, negative binomial and Cox proportional hazard regression.RESULTS: Among 21 351, 9.3% took antipsychotics continuously year 2-5, 38.6% took no antipsychotics, 3.4% sustained discontinuation and 48.7% discontinued and resumed treatment. At follow-up year 6, living with children or employment was significantly higher in individuals with sustained discontinuation (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.53-2.56 and OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.91-3.54), non-sustained discontinuation (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.48 and 2.04, 95% CI 1.64-2.53) and no antipsychotics (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.69-2.38 and 5.64, 95% CI 4.56-6.97) compared to continuous users. Individuals with non-sustained discontinuation had more psychiatric hospital admissions (IRR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.47) and longer admissions (IRR 1.68, 95% CI 1.30-2.16) year 5-6 compared to continuous users. Mortality during year 5-6 did not differ between groups.CONCLUSION: Most individuals with first-episode schizophrenia discontinued or took no antipsychotics the first years after diagnosis and had better functional outcomes. Non-sustained discontinuers had more, and longer admissions compared to continuous users. However, associations found could be either cause or effect.

AB - BACKGROUND: Discontinuation of antipsychotic medication may be linked to high risk of relapse, hospitalization and mortality. This study investigated the use and discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with first-episode schizophrenia in relation to cohabitation, living with children, employment, hospital admission and death.METHODS: Danish registers were used to establish a nationwide cohort of individuals ⩾18 years with schizophrenia included at the time of diagnosis in1995-2013. Exposure was antipsychotic medication calculated using defined daily dose and redeemed prescriptions year 2-5. Outcomes year 5-6 were analysed using binary logistic, negative binomial and Cox proportional hazard regression.RESULTS: Among 21 351, 9.3% took antipsychotics continuously year 2-5, 38.6% took no antipsychotics, 3.4% sustained discontinuation and 48.7% discontinued and resumed treatment. At follow-up year 6, living with children or employment was significantly higher in individuals with sustained discontinuation (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.53-2.56 and OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.91-3.54), non-sustained discontinuation (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.48 and 2.04, 95% CI 1.64-2.53) and no antipsychotics (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.69-2.38 and 5.64, 95% CI 4.56-6.97) compared to continuous users. Individuals with non-sustained discontinuation had more psychiatric hospital admissions (IRR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.47) and longer admissions (IRR 1.68, 95% CI 1.30-2.16) year 5-6 compared to continuous users. Mortality during year 5-6 did not differ between groups.CONCLUSION: Most individuals with first-episode schizophrenia discontinued or took no antipsychotics the first years after diagnosis and had better functional outcomes. Non-sustained discontinuers had more, and longer admissions compared to continuous users. However, associations found could be either cause or effect.

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291722002021

DO - 10.1017/S0033291722002021

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 35818718

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

ER -

ID: 79447292