Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Dihydralazine induces marked cerebral vasodilation in man

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. A totally new system is needed for drug research and development

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  2. Patients not patents: Drug research and development as a public enterprise

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Prediction of coronary heart disease or heart failure using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T: a pilot study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of exercise: role in diabetes and cardiovascular disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  5. Familial hypercholesterolaemia: cholesterol efflux and coronary disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Carotid atherosclerosis markers and adverse cardiovascular events

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  2. Clinical validation of three-dimensional ultrasound for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Versus Carotid Plaque Burden for Predicting Cardiovascular Risk

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. How vascular surgeons can learn ultrasound

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Dihydralazine is widely used for acute control of hypertension. In experimental studies it seems to dilate cerebral resistance vessels and increase intracranial pressure. However, the effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in man has been little studied. Measurements of CBF were performed with the i.v. xenon-133 technique in seven young, normotensive volunteers before and 15, 60 and 180 min after 6.25 mg i.v. dihydralazine, corresponding approximately to 0.1 mg kg-1 body weight. For comparison the CBF reactivity to inhalation of 5% CO2 in air was investigated. Dihydralazine increased CBF throughout the period of study, in median 16, 27 and 23% at the three periods of measurements, respectively. The arterial blood pressure remained unchanged, whereas heart rate increased significantly. During CO2 inhalation, CBF increased on average 29%. Thus, the cerebral vasodilation exerted by a small i.v. dose of dihydralazine was of the same order of magnitude as the effect of 5% CO2 inhalation. These results in normal subjects should be extrapolated to diseased persons only with extreme caution. Still, the very marked and long lasting vasodilation observed suggests that dihydralazine, from a theoretical point of view, in certain clinical situations may be harmful.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume17
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)214-7
Number of pages4
ISSN0014-2972
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1987

    Research areas

  • Adult, Blood Pressure, Brain, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Dihydralazine, Heart Rate, Humans, Hydralazine, Pulmonary Gas Exchange, Vasodilation

ID: 46028062