Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Differentiating between the central hypersomnias presents a challenge to the diagnosis of patients with hypersomnolence. Actitigraphy may support efforts to distinguish them. We aimed to evaluate: 1) the ability of actigraphy to quantify sleep continuity measures in comparison with polysomnography in patients with hypersomnolence; 2) whether actigraphy can distinguish patients with hypersomnolence with normal hypocretin-1 in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with narcolepsy type 1 and from sleep-healthy controls; and 3) the distinct activity profiles and circadian rhythms of patients with narcolepsy type 1, patients with hypersomnolence with normal hypocretin-1 in cerebrospinal fluid, and sleep-healthy controls.

METHOD: Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency tests and actigraphy were conducted in 14 patients with narcolepsy type 1, 29 patients with hypersomnolence with normal hypocretin-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and 15 sleep-healthy controls.

RESULTS: Actigraphy quantified several sleep continuity measures consistently with polysomnography in all the patients. Actigraphy distinguished patients with hypersomnolence with normal hypocretin-1 in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with narcolepsy type 1 and sleep-healthy controls. Patients with narcolepsy type 1 had poor sleep quality and altered circadian rest-activity rhythm compared with controls.

CONCLUSION: Actigraphy is an adequate tool for establishing the amount of night sleep and supports the differential diagnosis of patients with hypersomnolence.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume85
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
ISSN1389-9457
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2021

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/diagnosis
  • Humans
  • Narcolepsy/diagnosis
  • Orexins
  • Polysomnography
  • Sleep

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Diagnostic value of actigraphy in hypersomnolence disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this