Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Developmental arrest of germ cells in the pathogenesis of germ cell neoplasia

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains among adults and children in a tertiary referral centre in Lithuania

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. A short history of microbial biofilms and biofilm infections

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Biofilms and host response - helpful or harmful

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Diagnosis of biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Characterisation and localisation of the endocannabinoid system components in the adult human testis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Investigation of Viruses in Human Cancers by Multienrichment Approach

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Possible link between FSH and RANKL release from adipocytes in men with impaired gonadal function including Klinefelter syndrome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Populations, decreasing fertility, and reproductive health

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Clinical observations and epidemiological evidence suggest that important aetiopathological events that cause neoplastic transformation of the male germ cell may occur in fetal life or early infancy. The incidence of germ cell neoplasia is high in individuals with various disorders of gonadal development and sexual differentiation, such as gonadal dysgenesis or androgen insensitivity syndrome. Increased risk has also been noted in individuals with trisomy 21, idiopathic infertility and low birth weight. Infertility is sometimes associated with small aberrations of sex chromosomes (e.g. low frequency mosaicism XY/XO) which can also be found in patients with testicular cancer. The variety of conditions that predispose to testicular neoplasia and the rise in its incidence in many countries speaks for the influence of environmental factors which may affect genetically predisposed individuals. We hypothesise that if the development of the testis is disturbed or delayed, primordial germ cells or gonocytes undergo maturation delay or differentiation arrest which may render them susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Morphologically homogenous premalignant carcinoma in situ (CIS) cells have the potential to differentiate into a variety of histological forms of overt testicular tumours. Analysis of cell surface antigens expressed by CIS cells found in the vicinity of pure and mixed tumours demonstrates that CIS cells are phenotypically heterogeneous. Comparison of the phenotypes of CIS cells, primordial germ cells, human embryonal carcinoma cells and closely related primate embryonal stem cells reveals various similarities but also differences. We speculate that phenotypical heterogeneity of CIS cells may be associated with their potential to give rise to different tumour types, and may be related to the developmental stage of the early germ cell which has undergone malignant transformation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAPMIS : acta pathologica, microbiologica, et immunologica Scandinavica
Volume106
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)198-204; discussion 204-6
ISSN0903-4641
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1998

    Research areas

  • Adult, Carcinoma in Situ, Cell Differentiation, Cell Division, Chromosome Aberrations, Germinoma, Humans, Male, Sex Chromosomes, Testicular Neoplasms, Testis

ID: 44857127