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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Defective Natural Killer cell antiviral capacity in paediatric HBV infection

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Natural Killer (NK) cells exhibit dysregulated effector function in adult chronic HBV infection (CHB), which may contribute to virus persistence. The role of NK cells in children infected perinatally with HBV is less studied. Access to a unique cohort enabled the cross-sectional evaluation of NK cell frequency, phenotype and function in HBV-infected children relative to uninfected children. We observed a selective defect in NK cell IFN-γ production, with conserved cytolytic function, mirroring the functional dichotomy observed in adult infection. Reduced expression of NKp30 on NK cells suggests a role of impaired NK-Dendritic Cell (DC) cellular interactions as a potential mechanism leading to reduced IFN-γ production. The finding that NK cells are already defective in paediatric CHB, albeit less extensively than in adult CHB, has potential implications for the timing of antiviral therapy aiming to restore immune control.
Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
Volume179
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)466–476
ISSN0009-9104
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

Clinical & Experimental Immunology
Volume 179, Issue 3, pages 466–476, March 2015

ID: 44760192