Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Declining prevalence of cerebral palsy in children born at term in Denmark

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Pyridoxine or pyridoxal-5-phosphate treatment for seizures in glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency: A cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Nutritional screening of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: a scoping review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Anti-dopamine D2 receptor antibodies in chronic tic disorders

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Specialist health care services use in a European cohort of infants born very preterm

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. A Nationwide Observational Study of Chlamydia trachomatis Infections in Denmark during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Outcome of subsequent pregnancies in women with complete uterine rupture: A population-based case-control study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. First-trimester biomarkers and the risk of cerebral palsy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

AIM: To investigate reasons for the declining prevalence of cerebral palsy (CP) in children born at term in Denmark by evaluating obstetric and neonatal factors associated with CP, and their changes over time.

METHOD: In this cohort study, we included 987 495 children (504 600 [51.1%] males and 482 895 [48.9%] females) born after 37 completed gestational weeks during birth years 1997 to 2013. Risk ratios of CP for each factor were calculated with log-binominal regression analyses. Significant factors were evaluated concerning their development in prevalence over time.

RESULTS: In the antenatal period, there were significant associations with an increased risk of CP and high maternal body mass index (BMI), smoking during pregnancy, nulliparity, male sex, gestational age, and low birthweight. In the study period, fewer females smoked during pregnancy and fewer children were born post-term, dropping from 22.6% to 11.4% and 9.4% to 2.5% respectively. Conversely, the proportion of females with high BMI increased. Most significant risk factors were found in the neonatal period, with an increase in children with diagnosed birth defects and children admitted to neonatal care.

INTERPRETATION: Reasons for the declining prevalence of CP appear to be multifactorial and likely include the decline in maternal smoking and children born post-term along with centralization and advances in neonatal treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume64
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)715-722
Number of pages8
ISSN0012-1622
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

© 2021 Mac Keith Press.

    Research areas

  • Cerebral Palsy/epidemiology, Child, Cohort Studies, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Pregnancy, Prevalence, Risk Factors

ID: 70141379