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Dear reviewers: Responses to common reviewer critiques about infant neuroimaging studies

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  1. Brain structure associations with phonemic and semantic fluency in typically-developing children

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  • FIT'NG
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The field of adult neuroimaging relies on well-established principles in research design, imaging sequences, processing pipelines, as well as safety and data collection protocols. The field of infant magnetic resonance imaging, by comparison, is a young field with tremendous scientific potential but continuously evolving standards. The present article aims to initiate a constructive dialog between researchers who grapple with the challenges and inherent limitations of a nascent field and reviewers who evaluate their work. We address 20 questions that researchers commonly receive from research ethics boards, grant, and manuscript reviewers related to infant neuroimaging data collection, safety protocols, study planning, imaging sequences, decisions related to software and hardware, and data processing and sharing, while acknowledging both the accomplishments of the field and areas of much needed future advancements. This article reflects the cumulative knowledge of experts in the FIT'NG community and can act as a resource for both researchers and reviewers alike seeking a deeper understanding of the standards and tradeoffs involved in infant neuroimaging.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101055
JournalDevelopmental cognitive neuroscience
Volume53
Number of pages12
ISSN1878-9293
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank those who have supported the Fetal, Infant, and Toddler Neuroimaging Group (FIT'NG). We also thank Collin Gregg for his assistance with figure design. This work was supported by the National Science foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship DGE-1745038 to MCC), the National Institutes of Health (F31HD102156 to MCC; R01MH119251, R01MH118285, P50MH100029, K01MH108741, and R01EB027147 to SS; R01MH104324 and U01MH110274 to Lin and Elison, Co-I BRH; T32MH018268 and TL1TR001864 to AD; P50MH115716 to DS; the intramural research program (ZIAMH002782) supporting CAF), Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (Young Investigator Grant 2802 to CAF), and the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (the Marie Sk?odowska-Curie grant agreement No. 765148 to RL). BRH is an iTHRIV Scholar. The iTHRIV Scholars Program is supported in part by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the NIH under award numbers UL1TR003015 and KL2TR003016.

Funding Information:
We thank those who have supported the Fetal, Infant, and Toddler Neuroimaging Group (FIT’NG). We also thank Collin Gregg for his assistance with figure design. This work was supported by the National Science foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship DGE-1745038 to MCC), the National Institutes of Health ( F31HD102156 to MCC; R01MH119251, R01MH118285, P50MH100029, K01MH108741 , and R01EB027147 to SS; R01MH104324 and U01MH110274 to Lin and Elison, Co-I BRH; T32MH018268 and TL1TR001864 to AD; P50MH115716 to DS; the intramural research program ( ZIAMH002782 ) supporting CAF), Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (Young Investigator Grant 2802 to CAF), and the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 765148 to RL). BRH is an iTHRIV Scholar. The iTHRIV Scholars Program is supported in part by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the NIH under award numbers UL1TR003015 and KL2TR003016 .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors

    Research areas

  • Humans, Infant, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods, Neuroimaging/methods

ID: 70544105