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Current understanding of thalamic structure and function in migraine

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. PACAP27 induces migraine-like attacks in migraine patients

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  2. Exploration of purinergic receptors as potential anti-migraine targets using established pre-clinical migraine models

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  3. The spectrum of cluster headache: A case report of 4600 attacks

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  1. PACAP27 induces migraine-like attacks in migraine patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-27 on cerebral hemodynamics in healthy volunteers: A 3T MRI study

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  3. Calcitonin gene-related peptide - beyond migraine prophylaxis

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

  4. Post-traumatic headache: epidemiology and pathophysiological insights

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Objective: To review and discuss the literature on the role of thalamic structure and function in migraine. Discussion: The thalamus holds an important position in our understanding of allodynia, central sensitization and photophobia in migraine. Structural and functional findings suggest abnormal functional connectivity between the thalamus and various cortical regions pointing towards an altered pain processing in migraine. Pharmacological nociceptive modulation suggests that the thalamus is a potential drug target. Conclusion: A critical role for the thalamus in migraine-related allodynia and photophobia is well established. Additionally, the thalamus is most likely involved in the dysfunctional pain modulation and processing in migraine, but further research is needed to clarify the exact clinical implications of these findings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCephalalgia
Volume39
Issue number13
Pages (from-to)1675-1682
ISSN0333-1024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

    Research areas

  • allodynia, functional connectivity, Migraine, pain processing, photophobia, sensitization, thalamus

ID: 55587230