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Current Status of Handheld Otoscopy Training: A Systematic Review

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@article{3062fd516b6548318ad91672c557b3d8,
title = "Current Status of Handheld Otoscopy Training: A Systematic Review",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Otoscopy is a frequently performed procedure and competency in this skill is important across many specialties. We aim to systematically review current medical educational evidence for training of handheld otoscopy skills.METHODS: Following the PRISMA guideline, studies reporting on training and/or assessment of handheld otoscopy were identified searching the following databases: PubMed, Embase, OVID, the Cochrane Library, PloS Medicine, Directory of Open Access Journal (DOAJ), and Web of Science. Two reviewers extracted data on study design, training intervention, educational outcomes, and results. Quality of educational evidence was assessed along with classification according to Kirkpatrick's model of educational outcomes.RESULTS: The searches yielded a total of 6064 studies with a final inclusion of 33 studies for the qualitative synthesis. Handheld otoscopy training could be divided into workshops, physical simulators, web-based training/e-learning, and smartphone-enabled otoscopy. Workshops were the most commonly described educational intervention and typically consisted of lectures, hands-on demonstrations, and training on peers. Almost all studies reported a favorable effect on either learner attitude, knowledge, or skills. The educational quality of the studies was reasonable but the educational outcomes were mostly evaluated on the lower Kirkpatrick levels with only a single study determining the effects of training on actual change in the learner behavior.CONCLUSION: Overall, it seems that any systematic approach to training of handheld otoscopy is beneficial in training regardless of learner level, but the heterogeneity of the studies makes comparisons between studies difficult and the relative effect sizes of the interventions could not be determined.",
keywords = "assessment, competency-based medical education, handheld otoscopy, otology, technical skills training",
author = "Andreas Frithioff and Guldager, {Mads Juhl} and Andersen, {Steven Arild Wuyts}",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1177/0003489421997289",
language = "English",
volume = "130",
pages = "1190--1197",
journal = "Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology",
issn = "0003-4894",
publisher = "Annals Publishing Co",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Current Status of Handheld Otoscopy Training

T2 - A Systematic Review

AU - Frithioff, Andreas

AU - Guldager, Mads Juhl

AU - Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Otoscopy is a frequently performed procedure and competency in this skill is important across many specialties. We aim to systematically review current medical educational evidence for training of handheld otoscopy skills.METHODS: Following the PRISMA guideline, studies reporting on training and/or assessment of handheld otoscopy were identified searching the following databases: PubMed, Embase, OVID, the Cochrane Library, PloS Medicine, Directory of Open Access Journal (DOAJ), and Web of Science. Two reviewers extracted data on study design, training intervention, educational outcomes, and results. Quality of educational evidence was assessed along with classification according to Kirkpatrick's model of educational outcomes.RESULTS: The searches yielded a total of 6064 studies with a final inclusion of 33 studies for the qualitative synthesis. Handheld otoscopy training could be divided into workshops, physical simulators, web-based training/e-learning, and smartphone-enabled otoscopy. Workshops were the most commonly described educational intervention and typically consisted of lectures, hands-on demonstrations, and training on peers. Almost all studies reported a favorable effect on either learner attitude, knowledge, or skills. The educational quality of the studies was reasonable but the educational outcomes were mostly evaluated on the lower Kirkpatrick levels with only a single study determining the effects of training on actual change in the learner behavior.CONCLUSION: Overall, it seems that any systematic approach to training of handheld otoscopy is beneficial in training regardless of learner level, but the heterogeneity of the studies makes comparisons between studies difficult and the relative effect sizes of the interventions could not be determined.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Otoscopy is a frequently performed procedure and competency in this skill is important across many specialties. We aim to systematically review current medical educational evidence for training of handheld otoscopy skills.METHODS: Following the PRISMA guideline, studies reporting on training and/or assessment of handheld otoscopy were identified searching the following databases: PubMed, Embase, OVID, the Cochrane Library, PloS Medicine, Directory of Open Access Journal (DOAJ), and Web of Science. Two reviewers extracted data on study design, training intervention, educational outcomes, and results. Quality of educational evidence was assessed along with classification according to Kirkpatrick's model of educational outcomes.RESULTS: The searches yielded a total of 6064 studies with a final inclusion of 33 studies for the qualitative synthesis. Handheld otoscopy training could be divided into workshops, physical simulators, web-based training/e-learning, and smartphone-enabled otoscopy. Workshops were the most commonly described educational intervention and typically consisted of lectures, hands-on demonstrations, and training on peers. Almost all studies reported a favorable effect on either learner attitude, knowledge, or skills. The educational quality of the studies was reasonable but the educational outcomes were mostly evaluated on the lower Kirkpatrick levels with only a single study determining the effects of training on actual change in the learner behavior.CONCLUSION: Overall, it seems that any systematic approach to training of handheld otoscopy is beneficial in training regardless of learner level, but the heterogeneity of the studies makes comparisons between studies difficult and the relative effect sizes of the interventions could not be determined.

KW - assessment

KW - competency-based medical education

KW - handheld otoscopy

KW - otology

KW - technical skills training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85101717006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0003489421997289

DO - 10.1177/0003489421997289

M3 - Review

C2 - 33629599

VL - 130

SP - 1190

EP - 1197

JO - Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology

JF - Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology

SN - 0003-4894

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 62463202