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Comprehensive supervised heavy training program versus home training regimen in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized trial

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Background: There is no consensus on the best training regimen for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Several have been suggested, but never tested. The purpose of the study is to compare a comprehensive supervised training regimen (STR) based on latest evidence including heavy slow resistance training with a validated home-based regimen (HTR). We hypothesized that the STR would be superior to the HTR. Methods: Randomised control trial with blinded assessor. 126 consecutive patients with SIS were recruited and equally randomised to 12 weeks of either supervised training regimen (STR), or home-based training regimen (HTR). Primary outcomes were Constant Score (CS) and Shoulder Rating Questionnaire (SRQ) from baseline and 6 months after completed training. Results were analyzed according to intention-to treat principles. The study was retrospectively registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. Date of registration: 07/06/2021. Identification number: NCT04915430. Results: CS improved by 22.7 points for the STR group and by 23,7 points for the HTR (p = 0.0001). The SRQ improved by 17.7 and 18.1 points for the STR and the HTR groups respectively (p = 0.0001). The inter-group changes were non-significant. All secondary outcomes (passive and active range of motion, pain on impingement test, and resisted muscle tests) improved in both groups, without significant inter-group difference. Conclusion: We found no significant difference between a comprehensive supervised training regimen including heavy training principles, and a home-based training program in patients with SIS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number52
JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume23
Issue number1
ISSN1471-2474
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

    Research areas

  • Heavy slow resistance training, Rotator cuff, Shoulder, Subacromial impingement syndrome, Training

ID: 79244566