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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Augmented reality and mixed reality for healthcare education beyond surgery: an integrative review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewpeer-review

  2. Customisation of an instrument to assess anaesthesiologists' non-technical skills

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Customisation of an instrument to assess anaesthesioloists' non-technical skills

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleCommunication

  1. Medical dispatchers' perception of the interaction with the caller during emergency calls: a qualitative study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Data concerning the Copenhagen tool: A research tool for evaluation of basic life Support educational interventions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. The evolution of a national, advanced airway management simulation-based course for anaesthesia trainees

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills.

METHODS: Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed.

RESULTS: Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected from 13 trainees and 12 supervisors. Conversations lasted median eight (2-15) minutes. Supervisors used the elements and categories in the tool to structure the content of the conversations. Supervisors tended to talk about the trainees' actions and their own frames rather than attempting to understand the trainees' perceptions. Supervisors and trainees welcomed the feedback opportunity and agreed that the conversations were useful and comprehensive.

CONCLUSIONS: The content of the feedback conversations reflected the contents of the tool and the feedback was considered useful and comprehensive. However, supervisors talked primarily about their own frames, so in order for the feedback to reach its full potential, supervisors may benefit from training techniques to stimulate a deeper reflection among trainees.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Medical Education
Volume6
Pages (from-to)4-11
Number of pages8
ISSN2042-6372
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ID: 44866184