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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Complications after benign hysterectomy, according to procedure: a population-based prospective cohort study from the Danish hysterectomy database, 2004–2015

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Objective: To compare the risk of complications associated with benign hysterectomy according to surgical procedure. Design: Register-based prospective cohort study. Setting: Danish Hysterectomy Database, 2004–2015. Population: All Danish women with benign elective hysterectomy (n = 51 141). Methods: Multivariate log-binomial regression to compute relative risks (RRs) stratified by calendar period, and adjusted for age, height, weight, smoking habits, use of alcohol, comorbidity, indications, uterine weight and adhesions. Multiple imputation and ‘intention to treat’ analyses were performed. Main outcome measures: Major (grades III–V) and minor (grades I–II) Clavien–Dindo modified complications within 30 days. Results: Overall, major complications occurred in 3577 (7.0%) hysterectomies and minor complications occurred in 4788 (9.4%). The proportions of major and minor complications according to type of hysterectomy were: 10.3 and 9.6% for abdominal hysterectomy (AH); 4.1 and 12.1% for laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH); and 4.9 and 8.0% for vaginal hysterectomy (VH) for non-prolapse, and 2.3 and 6.4% for prolapse. In multivariate analyses, compared with VH for non-prolapse, the risk of major complications was higher for AH (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.63–2.03) but lower for both LH (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.90) and VH for prolapse (RR 0.55; 95% CI 0.41–0.75). For LH, the risk of major complications reduced from a RR of 0.96 (95% CI 0.75–1.22) in the time period 2004–2009 to an RR of 0.72 (95% CI 0.60–0.87) between 2010 and 2015. Conclusion: Laparoscopic hysterectomy and VH for uterine prolapse are associated with fewer major complications, and AH is associated with more major complications, compared with VH performed in the absence of uterine prolapse. Tweetable abstract: Laparoscopic hysterectomy has fewer major complications compared with vaginal hysterectomy, in the absence of uterine prolapse.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
ISSN1470-0328
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Mar 2020

Bibliographical note

© 2020 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

    Research areas

  • Complications, epidemiology, hysterectomy, laparoscopic, minimally invasive, surgical morbidity

ID: 59580664