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Comparison and assessment of necropsy lesions in end-of-lay laying hens from different housing systems in Denmark

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Wang, Chong ; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth ; Christensen, Jens Peter ; Bojesen, Anders Miki ; Thøfner, Ida. / Comparison and assessment of necropsy lesions in end-of-lay laying hens from different housing systems in Denmark. In: Poultry Science. 2020 ; Vol. 99, No. 1. pp. 119-128.

Bibtex

@article{203f1a6b9c0c4523b5eb8e17496b5d81,
title = "Comparison and assessment of necropsy lesions in end-of-lay laying hens from different housing systems in Denmark",
abstract = "Apperantly healthy laying hens at the end of production (60 to 91 wk) were investigated for the occurrence of pathology and bacterial infections. In total, 7,477 hens from 15 flocks representing the following production systems: Enriched cages, barn housed layers, and organic/free range layers were necropsied. Indications of bacterial infection were investigated by bacteriological cultivation. The overall prevalence of lesions was 16.60%, including lesions of both infectious and non-infectious origin. The most prevalent lesions were bursitis presternalis (6.65%), reproductive tract lesions (e.g., salpingitis and/or peritonitis and/or oophoritis) (3.50%), serosal scarification (e.g., fibrotic adhesive peritonitis) 1.55%, and neoplasm 1.73%. Significant differences were observed between different production systems and/or flocks in the prevalence of reproductive tract lesions, bursitis presternalis, serosal scarification, skin infections, juvenile hens, and traumas/fractures. No significant difference was observed between different production systems in the prevalence of neoplasia, infection of septicemic etiology, and pododermatitis. In total, 3.4% of the hens were out of lay, with significantly higher rate in organic flocks. Infections of the reproductive tract were the most prevalent lesions with bacterial etiology in all productions systems. In total, 40% of the hens with lesions associated to the oviduct were out of lay and significant difference between production systems were observed. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria and in 90% of the cases they were isolated from the reproductive tract lesions. The second most prevalent bacteria was Gallibacteruim anatis. Significant difference in the prevalence of E. coli positive hens was observed between production systems (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the prevalence of reproductive tract lesions in apparently healthy end-of-lay laying was higher than indicated in previous reports. These findings support the previous suggestions that E. coli and G. anatis are the major pathogens causing reproductive tract lesions.",
keywords = "Animal Husbandry/methods, Animals, Autopsy/veterinary, Bacterial Infections/classification, Chickens, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Housing, Animal, Poultry Diseases/classification, Prevalence, laying hens, pathology, subclinical infections, bacteriology, reproductive tract",
author = "Chong Wang and Pors, {Susanne Elisabeth} and Christensen, {Jens Peter} and Bojesen, {Anders Miki} and Ida Th{\o}fner",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2019 The Author(s) Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
doi = "10.3382/ps/pez569",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "119--128",
journal = "Poultry Science",
issn = "0032-5791",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison and assessment of necropsy lesions in end-of-lay laying hens from different housing systems in Denmark

AU - Wang, Chong

AU - Pors, Susanne Elisabeth

AU - Christensen, Jens Peter

AU - Bojesen, Anders Miki

AU - Thøfner, Ida

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2019 The Author(s) Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - Apperantly healthy laying hens at the end of production (60 to 91 wk) were investigated for the occurrence of pathology and bacterial infections. In total, 7,477 hens from 15 flocks representing the following production systems: Enriched cages, barn housed layers, and organic/free range layers were necropsied. Indications of bacterial infection were investigated by bacteriological cultivation. The overall prevalence of lesions was 16.60%, including lesions of both infectious and non-infectious origin. The most prevalent lesions were bursitis presternalis (6.65%), reproductive tract lesions (e.g., salpingitis and/or peritonitis and/or oophoritis) (3.50%), serosal scarification (e.g., fibrotic adhesive peritonitis) 1.55%, and neoplasm 1.73%. Significant differences were observed between different production systems and/or flocks in the prevalence of reproductive tract lesions, bursitis presternalis, serosal scarification, skin infections, juvenile hens, and traumas/fractures. No significant difference was observed between different production systems in the prevalence of neoplasia, infection of septicemic etiology, and pododermatitis. In total, 3.4% of the hens were out of lay, with significantly higher rate in organic flocks. Infections of the reproductive tract were the most prevalent lesions with bacterial etiology in all productions systems. In total, 40% of the hens with lesions associated to the oviduct were out of lay and significant difference between production systems were observed. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria and in 90% of the cases they were isolated from the reproductive tract lesions. The second most prevalent bacteria was Gallibacteruim anatis. Significant difference in the prevalence of E. coli positive hens was observed between production systems (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the prevalence of reproductive tract lesions in apparently healthy end-of-lay laying was higher than indicated in previous reports. These findings support the previous suggestions that E. coli and G. anatis are the major pathogens causing reproductive tract lesions.

AB - Apperantly healthy laying hens at the end of production (60 to 91 wk) were investigated for the occurrence of pathology and bacterial infections. In total, 7,477 hens from 15 flocks representing the following production systems: Enriched cages, barn housed layers, and organic/free range layers were necropsied. Indications of bacterial infection were investigated by bacteriological cultivation. The overall prevalence of lesions was 16.60%, including lesions of both infectious and non-infectious origin. The most prevalent lesions were bursitis presternalis (6.65%), reproductive tract lesions (e.g., salpingitis and/or peritonitis and/or oophoritis) (3.50%), serosal scarification (e.g., fibrotic adhesive peritonitis) 1.55%, and neoplasm 1.73%. Significant differences were observed between different production systems and/or flocks in the prevalence of reproductive tract lesions, bursitis presternalis, serosal scarification, skin infections, juvenile hens, and traumas/fractures. No significant difference was observed between different production systems in the prevalence of neoplasia, infection of septicemic etiology, and pododermatitis. In total, 3.4% of the hens were out of lay, with significantly higher rate in organic flocks. Infections of the reproductive tract were the most prevalent lesions with bacterial etiology in all productions systems. In total, 40% of the hens with lesions associated to the oviduct were out of lay and significant difference between production systems were observed. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria and in 90% of the cases they were isolated from the reproductive tract lesions. The second most prevalent bacteria was Gallibacteruim anatis. Significant difference in the prevalence of E. coli positive hens was observed between production systems (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the prevalence of reproductive tract lesions in apparently healthy end-of-lay laying was higher than indicated in previous reports. These findings support the previous suggestions that E. coli and G. anatis are the major pathogens causing reproductive tract lesions.

KW - Animal Husbandry/methods

KW - Animals

KW - Autopsy/veterinary

KW - Bacterial Infections/classification

KW - Chickens

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Female

KW - Housing, Animal

KW - Poultry Diseases/classification

KW - Prevalence

KW - laying hens

KW - pathology

KW - subclinical infections

KW - bacteriology

KW - reproductive tract

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077844396&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3382/ps/pez569

DO - 10.3382/ps/pez569

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32416793

VL - 99

SP - 119

EP - 128

JO - Poultry Science

JF - Poultry Science

SN - 0032-5791

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 61720317